Courses

East Asian Content Courses (Fall 2024)

20th-Century Japan (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 322 / EAS 324 / URB 324

Covering 1868 to the present, this course emphasizes Japan's dramatic rise as the modern world's first non-Western power, imperialism, industrialization, social change, gender relations, democracy, World War II, the U. S. Occupation, the postwar "economic miracle" followed by slow growth, and the preoccupation with national identity in a Western-dominated world. We will think about post-1945 developments in terms of continuities with prewar Japan. We will also hold Japan up as a "mirror" for America, comparing how the two capitalist societies have dealt with inequality, urbanization, health and welfare, and intervention in the economy.

Instructors
20th-Century Japanese History
Subject associations
HIS 527 / EAS 522

Readings in Japanese political, social, and economic history. Topics include transwar continuity and change, political economy, labor, gender issues, culture and state, religion, Japanese expansion and colonialism, the Allied Occupation of Japan and "social management." Some readings in Japanese (optional for those who do not specialize in Japanese history).

Instructors
A Monster History of Japan, from Kojiki to Godzilla (HA)
Subject associations
EAS 345 / HIS 246

This class introduces students to the tradition of monstrous imagination in Japanese history, from the earlier texts of the 8th century to the most recent films. Students will be exposed to a vast array of sources depicting different monstrous creatures. Monsters will function as the meaning-making devises through which students will understand different aspects of Japanese culture through twelve centuries of its history. Far from being simply figures of imaginations, the vast coterie of monstrous creatures and phenomena 'interacted' in very concrete ways with people, influencing their political, economic, and social life.

Instructors
Aesthetics and Politics of Chinese Painting (LA)
Subject associations
ART 216 / EAS 213

In this thematic introduction to the role of painting in Chinese cultural history, we will attend to the critical questions discussed within the field of Chinese painting in particular and art history in general. These questions, revolving around the dynamic between aesthetics and politics, include the influence of class, gender, political changes, and social behavior on painting; the formation of painting canons and lineages; and how local and global elements interacted in early modern, modern and contemporary Chinese painting. Students will have the opportunity to study Chinese painting first hand.

Instructors
Cheng-hua Wang
Chinese Politics (SA)
Subject associations
POL 362 / SPI 323 / EAS 362

This course provides an overview of China's political system. We will begin with a brief historical overview of China's political development from 1949 to the present. The remainder of the course will examine the key challenges facing the current generation of CCP leadership, focusing on prospects for democratization and political reform. Among other topics, we will examine: factionalism and political purges; corruption; avenues for political participation; village elections; public opinion; protest movements and dissidents; co-optation of the business class; and media and internet control.

Instructors
Rory Truex
Early China: The Shangshu and the Origins of Chinese Political Philosophy
Subject associations
EAS 504

Readings in the Shangshu and its traditional commentaries, with a review of its history of scholarship from antiquity to the present. Specific issues of discussion include the role of the Shangshu in Warring States and Han political and philosophical discourse, the formation of its different chapters in terms of language and ideology, its relation to bronze inscriptions and the Shijing, its presence in recently excavated manuscripts, and its place in Zhou political and religious ritual.

Instructors
East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations (EM)
Subject associations
HUM 233 / EAS 233 / COM 233

An introduction to the literature, art, religion and philosophy of China, Japan and Korea from antiquity to ca. 1600. Readings focus on primary texts in translation and are complemented by museum visits and supplementary materials on the course website. The course aims to allow students to explore the unique aspects of East Asian civilizations and the connections between them through an interactive web-based platform, in which assignments are integrated with the texts and media on the website. No prior knowledge of East Asia or experience working with digital media is required.

Instructors
Antonin A. Ferre
Feminist Pedagogies in Modern Trans-East Asia: History, Theory and Practice (CD or SA)
Subject associations
EAS 419 / COM 467 / GSS 449

This course explores feminist pedagogies and praxis across East Asia, focusing on historical practices of political and social activism, collective action, community work, and healing, care and self-discovery. It investigates how these practices, whether explicitly framed as feminist and/or pedagogical, have constituted powerful forms of resistance to hegemonic forms of power, particularly those of masculinity and hetero-patriarchy. By studying historical contingent and concretized forms of pedagogy, we aim to gain a greater understanding of feminist pedagogies as complex, embodied and social processes of knowledge-making.

Instructors
Gender and Genre in Japanese Cinema (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 306 / GSS 295

This course explores the interplay between genre and gender in 20th and 21st century Japanese cinema. This task entails, as described by Christine Gledhill, reconfiguring their relationship "not in terms of social reflection, ideological misrepresentation, or subject positioning but as cinematic affect and discursive circulation between society and story, public and imaginary worlds." We will study how various film genres translate gender discourses and ideologies into aesthetic experiences, and how gender's aesthetic and imaginative power brings genres to life as dynamic processes of cultural production and social transformation.

Instructors
History of the Manchu People and their Culture (CD or HA)
Subject associations
HIS 483 / EAS 483

Who were the Manchu people, who once ruled the mighty Qing empire (1636-1911) over China? Alternatively celebrated and villainized in Sinocentric historiography, the Manchus have become a complex symbol for imperial China's last glories and humiliations. This seminar questions the dominant narratives of racialization and cultural assimilation by exploring the formation of Manchu ethnicity over four hundred years. Using revisionist scholarship and primary sources, the course seeks to de-mystify Manchu history and culture by critically examining the ideological scaffolding of ethnic identity and its constitutive human experiences.

Instructors
Japanese Philosophy: A Modern History, 1600-1945
Subject associations
EAS 527 / HIS 522

This seminar has two main goals. The first is to offer a survey of the philosophical production of Japan from the Tokugawa period to the end of the Second World War, with a focus on the socio-political and intellectual conditions that favored the development of sophisticated philosophical discourses, their terminology, recurring themes, and changing authorizing/legitimating strategies. The second is to investigate on the heuristic adequacy of the Western term "philosophy" to understand forms and style of speculative thinking in Japan.

Instructors
Junior Seminar
Subject associations
EAS 300

This seminar teaches the research and writing skills needed to produce a thesis as an East Asian studies major. Through mini-projects and guest lectures, the class introduces the various disciplines and methodologies used to study East Asia, including history, anthropology, political science, history, literature, and media studies. In addition, the class teaches techniques of research and writing: how to formulate a research question, find and use appropriate sources, write a research proposal, craft a compelling introduction and convincing conclusion.

Instructors
Literary Sinitic and Transnational Literatures
Subject associations
EAS 538

A confluence of research in literature, linguistics, and the history of writing has encouraged new approaches to Literary Sinitic (wenyan) as a transregional and interliterate medium. This seminar introduces core debates in this emerging field on vernacularization, influence, glossing, disciplinarity, "extraterritorial" Chinese texts (yuwai Hanji), and the Sinographic cosmopolis. We further read examples of reception, commentary, and local composition in Literary Sinitic from the Japanese context to consider how these theories can be applied or contested.

Instructors
Manga: Visual Culture in Modern Japan (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 211 / COM 213 / ART 225

This course examines the comic book as an expressive medium in Japan. Reading a range of works, classic and contemporary, in a variety of genres, we consider: How has the particular history of Japan shaped cartooning as an art form there? What critical approaches can help us think productively about comics (and other popular culture)? How can we translate the effects of a visual medium into written scholarly language? What do changes in media technology, literacy, and distribution mean for comics today? Coursework will combine readings, written analysis, and technical exercises. All readings in English. No fine arts experience required.

Instructors
Modern China
Subject associations
HIS 530 / EAS 520

This seminar introduces students to major historiographical issues and methodological issues in China's twentieth-century history. The content is divided evenly between the Republic period and PRC history, with occasional forays back to the Qing dynasty. Topics reflect theoretical debates and empirical questions, including: nationalism, civil society, urban life, gender and sexuality, war and revolution, science, law.

Instructors
Modern Japanese Prose
Subject associations
EAS 542

A study of selected major authors and literary trends in modern Japan, with an emphasis on the Meiji and Taisho periods.

Instructors
Moving Images: Contemporary Asian American Cinema (CD)
Subject associations
EAS 350 / ASA 350 / AMS 251

This course convenes experiences of watching and thinking about contemporary Asian American film. The syllabus is built around narrative films made by and about ethnicized Asians that have crossed the threshold of commercial viability or popular visibility in America. The central critical theme: how can the structure, flow, and mood of film, diminished in cultural capital but still vital as a form of imaginative storytelling, inspire incisive modes of seeing, feeling, and thinking what it means to be Asian in the world today? Core methods of film analysis and surveys of Asian American history inform the meditations on that central theme.

Instructors
Nomadic Empires: From the Scythian Confederation to the Mongol Conquest (HA)
Subject associations
EAS 280 / HIS 279

In telling histories of East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and Europe, various groups of nomadic people often loomed large in the background and served as the foil to the travail of their sedentary neighbors. In this course we put the nomadic peoples of Inner Asia front and center, and ask how the nomadic way of life and mode of state building served as agents of change in pre-modern Eurasia.

Instructors
Poetry in Chinese Film and Media (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 333

This course examines the uses of poetry in Chinese films and media products from the early twentieth century to the present. We will focus on how poetry and cinema work with each other to expand imaginations of the Chinese-speaking world. How do filmmakers juxtapose traditional Chinese verses with modern settings? How does poetry in other languages cast an unexpected light on Chinese homes, villages, rivers and mountains, and outer space? How might cinema illumine hidden aspects of Chinese cities by capturing underground poetry scenes? The course ends by considering the impact of current fast media consumption on how we enjoy films and poems.

Instructors
Postwar Japanese Narrative: Modern to Postmodern (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 344 / COM 344

This course examines postwar Japanese experience through major literary, cinematic, and intellectual achievements. The objective is first to analyze a multitude of struggles in the aftermath of the Asia-Pacific War, and then to inquire into the nature of post-industrial prosperity in capitalist consumerism and the emergence of postmodernism. The course will cover representative postwar figures such as, Oe Kenzaburo, Dazai Osamu, Mishima Yukio, as well as contemporary writers such as Murakami Haruki. Topics include the rise of democratic ideas, unsolved issues of war memories, and the tension between serious and "popular" fiction writing.

Instructors
Readings in Ancient and Medieval Japanese History
Subject associations
EAS 568 / HIS 568

This course is designed to introduce fundamental themes and debates about ancient and medieval Japanese history, and how conceptualizations of Japan have changed over time from the third century CE through 1600. Approximately two books, or a comparable number of articles, are required each week, and wherever possible, a brief passage of Japanese scholarship is presented as well. Reading knowledge of modern Japanese is desirable.

Instructors
Thomas D. Conlan
Readings in Modern Chinese Intellectual History (LA)
Subject associations
CHI 411 / EAS 411

This course is designed for students who have had advanced training in modern Chinese. The focus of readings is modern Chinese intellectual history. Topics that will be discussed include language reform, women's emancipation, the encounter of western civilization, the rise of communism, etc.

Instructors
Readings in Modern Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 401 / EAS 401

This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced higher level. Students will discuss various issues using short novels, essays, editorials and films. They are also expected to use the Japanese language to communicate people outside of class. Through these activities, students will develop critical thinking skills as well as Japanese language skills.

Instructors
Readings in Modern Korean l (LA)
Subject associations
KOR 405 / EAS 405

This sixth-year Korean course is designed to advance students' reading and writing skills to the superior level and to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, culture, society, and history. Readings cover various types of authentic materials (e.g., newspaper articles, editorials, think pieces, essays, and contemporary literary short stories). Discussion and presentation skills in formal settings (e.g., academic, professional) are also emphasized. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.

Instructors
Script Theories: Korea, East Asia, and Beyond
Subject associations
EAS 580 / COM 580

This seminar considers the issues of language, writing, and inscription in a broad comparative perspective that brings together critical theory and recent scholarship on Korea and East Asia. It traces the issues of language and inscription against the frameworks of semiology (Derrida, Irigaray), discursive order (Foucault, Kittler), folds of matter and power (Deleuze), and ideological control (Althusser). The class also uses this theoretical framework to build our understanding of Korean (and, when applicable, East Asian) writing systems, from calligraphy, to the development of print and digital culture. All readings available in English.

Instructors
Song Dynasty Painting (LA)
Subject associations
ART 428 / EAS 428

The Song Dynasty has long been considered the high point of Chinese painting, representing a classical period to which later artists consistently looked back. This seminar will explore the artistic qualities and development of landscape, figure, and flower-and-bird painting and will consider main issues concerning these genres. Such issues include the relative importance of different genres, the relationship between the natural and the human world, the roles of the court and literati in producing art, and the materiality and visuality of Song painting.

Instructors
Cheng-hua Wang
Strange Korean Families (EM)
Subject associations
EAS 372 / COM 377

Using family as a lens and a theme that brings together an array of vastly different literary, filmic, and theoretical works, this class will examine key moments in the history of Korea from 2019 to old times. We will look into disenchanted families, violent families, cyborg families, mixed race families, immigrant families, South and North Korean families, royal families, and more. Maintaining the longue-duree historical perspective, we will ponder on the ethical and aesthetic premises of kinship and family as modes of configuring human reciprocity and ways to imagine and live life.

Instructors
The Arts of Japan (LA)
Subject associations
ART 217 / EAS 217

This course surveys the history of art-making in Japan, from prehistory to the present. We will explore a broad range of media, including paintings, sculpture, architecture, prints, ceramics, and photography by focusing on the life stories of individual things. Over the semester we will strengthen and refine our ability to translate what we see into a language of form, and to give form meaning through awareness of methods of making, and by interrogating historical and contemporary contexts. The course includes study of original works of art in campus collections.

The Chinese Erotic Novel: Jin Ping Mei
Subject associations
EAS 588

This course explores the late-sixteenth-century novel Jin Ping Mei in its historical and cultural context. Textually, we read all one hundred chapters, compare different editions and textual predecessors (through DH tools), explore illustrations and issues of visuality, and ask questions about authors and commentaries. Contextually, we investigate crucial aspects of late-Ming culture, print culture, medicinal knowledge, monetization, news and gossip, gender, and game culture. and discuss the way these cultural discourses structured the text in terms of content, form, and ideology.

Instructors
The Origins of Japanese Culture and Civilization: A History of Japan until 1600 (HA)
Subject associations
EAS 218 / HIS 209 / MED 209

This course is designed to introduce the culture and history of Japan, and to examine how one understands and interprets the past. In addition to considering how a culture, a society, and a state develop, we will try to reconstruct the tenor of life in "ancient" and "medieval" Japan and chart how patterns of Japanese civilization shifted through time.

Instructors
Thomas D. Conlan
Translating East Asia (CD or LA)
Subject associations
TRA 304 / EAS 304 / HUM 333 / COM 373

Translation is at the core of our encounters with East Asia. From translations of the literary classics to contemporary novels and poetry, from the formation of modern East Asian cultural discourses to national identities to East-West travels of works in theater and film, the seminar poses fundamental questions to our encounters with East Asian cultural artifacts, reflecting on the classical principles of translation and problematizing what the "translation" of "original works" even means anymore in our globalized world. Open to students with or without knowledge of an East Asian language.

Instructors
Women and War in Asia/America (CD or HA)
Subject associations
HIS 486 / GSS 486 / EAS 486 / ASA 486

How do women in Asia become "gendered" in times of war-as caregivers, as refugees, as sex workers, as war brides? This course offers an introductory survey of American wars in Asia from 1899 to the present, taking the perspectives not of Americans but of the historically marginalized. Students will be challenged to rethink and reimagine war histories through voices on the ground across Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines, Okinawa, Hawaii, and Guam. foregrounding written testimonies and oral histories of women against the backdrop of war, militarism, and empire, the course will also make broader connections across the Asia pacific.

Chinese-Language Courses (Fall 2024)

Elementary Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 101

An introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese, emphasizing oral-aural facility and the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Instructors
Fifth Year Modern Chinese I: Language and Culture in Contemporary China
Subject associations
CHI 451

Designed for students with advanced training in modern Chinese, this course will further students' language comprehension, communication skills, and cultural understanding. Students will embark on a comprehensive exploration of contemporary Chinese society, delving into a wide array of linguistic topics, such as the impact of societal development on the evolution of Chinese language, the rise of cultural awareness as reflected in linguistic behaviors in Chinese society, and the use of AI in language studies. Course curriculum will emphasize interactive discussions, diverse listening and speaking exercises, and project-based assignments.

Instructors
Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 403

This course consists of reading and discussion of selections from Chinese media on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.

Instructors
Intensive Elementary Chinese
Subject associations
CHI 103

Chinese 103 is designed for students who already have some familiarity with spoken Mandarin or any Chinese dialect. This course will emphasize the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Instructors
Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 405

This course consists of reading and discussion based on newspaper articles and essays by famous Chinese intellectuals on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Students will also be exposed to literary writings.

Instructors
Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 305

Chinese 305 will further develop student's overall language skills through readings and discussion of contemporary issues published in Chinese media. This course is designed for students who have familiarity with spoken Mandarin or any Chinese dialect.

Instructors
Intermediate Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 105

While reinforcing the knowledge students have acquired thus far, this course will further develop the students' audio-lingual proficiency and bring their reading and writing ability to a higher level.

Instructors
Introduction to Classical Chinese I (HA)
Subject associations
CHI 301

Chinese 301 provides basic training for students in classical Chinese and introduces students to theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as the concept of Dao, life and death, Confucian ethics, etc. Each theme consists of passages selected from Chinese classics and short essays or stories full of wisdom and wit from later dynasties. This course will not only improve your four skills in Chinese language (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) but also enhances your general understanding of traditional Chinese philosophy and culture.

Instructors
Introductory Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 1002

Introductory Chinese (CHI 1002) is a continuation of CHI 1001, an introductory course for true beginners. It is taught at half the instructional pace of First Year Chinese (CHI 101). The goal of this course is to develop students' four basic communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, using both the Pinyin Romanization phonetic system and simplified (modern) Chinese characters. By the end of this course, students will be able to handle simple "survival situations" in Chinese, read and write over 300 Chinese characters, and engage in more advanced and intensive study of Chinese in the future.

Readings in Modern Chinese Intellectual History (LA)
Subject associations
CHI 411 / EAS 411

This course is designed for students who have had advanced training in modern Chinese. The focus of readings is modern Chinese intellectual history. Topics that will be discussed include language reform, women's emancipation, the encounter of western civilization, the rise of communism, etc.

Instructors
Third-Year Modern Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 303

This course is designed to further develop students' overall language skills through reading and discussion of contemporary issues published in Chinese media.

Instructors

Japanese-Language Courses (Fall 2024)

Advanced Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 301

This course is designed to further students' reading ability. Students will have ample opportunity to hear and use increasingly more sophisticated vocabulary and grammatical constructions through discussion and composition. Japanese video will also be incorporated into the course. Reading materials include "Tobira" and selected readings from works in the original language.

Instructors
Hisae Matsui
Contemporary Japanese Language and Culture I
Subject associations
JPN 407

This course emphasizes continued development of the four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) used in academic or professional settings. Materials include novels, essays, reports, films, and documentaries. The goal of this course is "superior" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.

Instructors
Elementary Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 101

An intensive introduction to modern Japanese stressing oral-aural facility, but including an introduction to written Japanese.

Instructors
Integrative Advanced Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 305

This course focuses on speaking, reading, listening, and writing with the goal of preparing students to continue on to JPN 306 in the spring. Reading materials include short novels, and essays. Video materials are also used to enhance listening and communication skills. The goal of this course is "advanced" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.

Instructors
Intermediate Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 105

This course aims to give a thorough mastery of modern colloquial Japanese (Tokyo speech) by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points and more advanced vocabulary and grammar. Students will reinforce four major skills by using speaking - listening drills, readings, and written exercises.

Instructors
Hisae Matsui
Introductory Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 1002

JPN 1002 (a continuation of JPN 1001) is an introductory Japanese course for true beginners. The course will be taught at half the pace of the standard elementary Japanese course, JPN 101. This introductory course stresses oral-aural facility, but it also includes an introduction to written Japanese, including hiragana, katakana and some basic kanji. After taking JPN 1001 and JPN 1002, students will have developed basic abilities to handle simple social situations in Japanese and be well prepared for the second half of the standard elementary Japanese courses (JPN102), which is offered every spring term.

Readings in Modern Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 401 / EAS 401

This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced higher level. Students will discuss various issues using short novels, essays, editorials and films. They are also expected to use the Japanese language to communicate people outside of class. Through these activities, students will develop critical thinking skills as well as Japanese language skills.

Instructors

Korean-Language Courses (Fall 2024)

Advanced Korean I
Subject associations
KOR 301

Advanced Korean is designed for students to continue expanding linguistic repertoire and develop fluency in both oral and literary skills. Expansion of vocabulary and grammar, effectiveness in speech and writing, as well as intercultural knowledge are stressed through short readings and class discussions. Readings include different styles of writing on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history.

Instructors
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture I
Subject associations
KOR 401

The fifth-year Korean course is designed to accelerate students' Korean proficiency to a high-advanced level and to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language and its people. Readings dealing with a variety of cultural and social topics in contemporary society are drawn from authentic texts (e.g., newspaper articles, think pieces, essays, and online materials), accompanied by various audiovisual materials. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.

Instructors
Elementary Korean I
Subject associations
KOR 101

Elementary Korean is designed for beginning students who intend to build a solid foundation for further study in the Korean language. The course provides four balanced language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - needed for basic communication. It emphasizes the ability to use Korean appropriately and introduces students to useful information concerning culture and daily life in Korea.

Instructors
Integrative Korean I
Subject associations
KOR 303

This fourth-year Korean course is designed to improve students' communicative and cultural competence to the advanced-mid level and to enhance their critical thinking skills through community engagement in academic and real-world contexts. Various authentic reading and audiovisual materials are reviewed in class discussion, presentation skills are emphasized, and a wider range of formal vocabulary and Korean proverbs is introduced.

Instructors
Intensive Korean I
Subject associations
KOR 103

The first part of Intensive Korean is designed for heritage students who have already had considerable amount of exposure to the Korean language and culture but have not received any formal instruction before their arriving at Princeton. It covers the Elementary Korean material focusing on vocabulary building, grammar, reading and writing.

Instructors
Intermediate Korean I
Subject associations
KOR 105

Intermediate Korean is designed for students who have acquired the fundamentals of the Korean language and wish to enhance their language skills. The course covers complex sentences and grammar while also reviewing the basics, and cultural aspects of language learning are reinforced through readings and media. Emphasis is placed on balancing all four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Instructors
Readings in Modern Korean l (LA)
Subject associations
KOR 405 / EAS 405

This sixth-year Korean course is designed to advance students' reading and writing skills to the superior level and to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, culture, society, and history. Readings cover various types of authentic materials (e.g., newspaper articles, editorials, think pieces, essays, and contemporary literary short stories). Discussion and presentation skills in formal settings (e.g., academic, professional) are also emphasized. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.

Instructors

East Asian Content Courses (Spring 2024)

20th-Century Japanese Literature
Subject associations
EAS 544

Readings in selected texts in modern Japanese literature.

Instructors
Bamboo, Silk, Wood, and Paper: Ancient and Medieval Chinese Manuscripts (HA)
Subject associations
EAS 326 / HIS 331 / MED 326 / HUM 381

The seminar introduces the manuscript culture of ancient and medieval China from the 4th century BCE to the advent of printing in around 1000 CE. We discuss the creation, uses, purposes, and the visual and material aspects of writings on bamboo, wood, silk, and paper. Examining texts buried in ancient tombs, left in watchtowers, or stored in desert caves, we look at writings to accompany the dead; personal letters; calligraphic masterpieces; copies of the classics; and carriers of medical, legal, administrative, or mantic knowledge cherished by the cultural and political elite and soldiers and peasants alike. With two museum visits.

Instructors
Buddhist Stuff: Material Culture and Worldly Desire (LA)
Subject associations
REL 382 / EAS 382

Our world is filled with stuff. Some people have too much. Others want more. Advertisers promise happiness through possessions, while psychologists tell us there's a limit to how much pleasure wealth can bring. Meanwhile trash heaps overflow, creating environmental disasters. How do we live in a material world? Do objects bring us happiness or cause hardship? What is the value of stuff? This class explores how Buddhists have responded to these questions over the last 2,500 years through readings as well as hands-on learning using rare books and precious works of art in the Princeton University Art Museum and Library collections.

Instructors
Bryan D. Lowe
Chinese Literature: The Classic of Poetry (Shijing)
Subject associations
EAS 531

Through close readings of original sources in classical Chinese, we analyze the Classic of Poetry (Shijing) in its aesthetic, historical, and hermeneutic dimensions from pre-imperial manuscripts through modern scholarship. In addition to reading the actual poetry and its classical commentaries, we discuss in detail its origins of composition and its reception as the master text of early Chinese cultural memory and identity, drawing on the relevant scholarship in Chinese, Japanese, English, and other languages.

Instructors
Classics, Commentaries, and Contexts in Chinese Intellectual History: Ritual Classics
Subject associations
EAS 506 / HIS 531

This course examines classical Chinese texts and their commentary traditions, with commentary selections and additional readings from the earliest periods through the early twentieth century. Readings are selected from the three ritual classics (so-called San Li), historical writings, and excavated manuscripts relating to ritual, broadly construed. Secondary readings selected from the theory of ritual and the use of ritual texts and commentaries in Chinese intellectual, social, and cultural history.

Instructors
East Asia since 1800 (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 208 / EAS 208

This course is an introduction to the history of modern East Asia. We will examine the inter-related histories of China, Japan, and Korea since 1800 and their relationships with the wider world. Major topics include: trade and cultural exchanges, reform and revolutions, war, colonialism, imperialism, and Cold War geopolitics.

Instructors
Matyas Mervay
East Asian Humanities II: Traditions and Transformations (EM)
Subject associations
HUM 234 / EAS 234 / COM 234

Second in the two-semester sequence on East Asian literary humanities, this course begins in the seventeenth century and covers a range of themes in the history, literature, and culture of Japan, Korea, and China until the contemporary period. Looking into the narratives of modernity, colonialism, urban culture, and war and disaster, we will see East Asia as a space for encounters, contestations, cultural currents and countercurrents. No knowledge of East Asian languages or history is required and first-year students are welcome to take the course.

Europe in the Making of Early Modern Chinese Art (HA)
Subject associations
ART 421 / ECS 421 / EAS 421

Direct and regular contact between China and Europe in the early modern period brought new artistic forms and expressions to China and reconfigured the entire picture of Chinese art. Even though China appeared to have been the recipient of European art, it did not play a passive role; in fact, Chinese agents, including emperors, artists, literati, and merchants, appropriated European artistic resources according to their own agendas. This seminar will tackle the multiple dimensions of how European art worked at the Chinese imperial court and in local societies from the late sixteenth to the early nineteenth century.

Instructors
Cheng-hua Wang
History of the Book in Japan
Subject associations
EAS 539

This course covers a history of textual artifacts in premodern Japan and hands-on training in analyzing extant materials. Topics covered include bindings, paper, glosses, colophons, fragments, paleography, publishing, xylography, movable type, collation, literacy, and cataloging, making use of materials from Princeton's East Asian Library Rare Books Collection.

Instructors
How Does It Move?: Action and Moving Image in Modern Japanese Media (CD)
Subject associations
EAS 262 / COM 262

The course offers an introduction to moving image cultures in modern Japan with a focus on how technological aesthetic media has transformed the experience and understanding of action. While emphasis is placed on the production and reception of popular action film genres from Japan, the course also explores the relationship of those films to international film cultures in the context of broader historical transformations in media practices and in modes of distribution and reception. We will engage with ethical and political questions concerning issues such as gendered and racialized representations of action and the aesthetics of violence.

Instructors
Introduction to Kanbun
Subject associations
EAS 546

Introduction to the basics of reading Chinese-style Classical Japanese and its related forms. Texts: Literary and historical texts from both China and Japan.

Instructors
Keiko Ono
Japan Anthropology in Historical Perspective
Subject associations
EAS 549 / ANT 549

The course concerns Japan studies in the context of theories of capitalism, personhood, democracy, gender, and modernity. We consider the emergence of Japan as a place to think within the American social sciences after World War II and the development of ideas about area studies in the context of the Cold War and post Cold War conjunctures. Additionally the course considers topics in which Japan is relevant to thinking about global issues, including global capitalism, temporary labor, biopolitics, environmental consciousness, media culture and consumer culture, work-life balance, and the demographic crisis related to rapid aging.

Instructors
Japanese Literature to 1800: The Major Texts (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 219

This course introduces the core texts of Japanese narrative, lyric, and thought, ca. 700-1800, with reference to visual and material culture. Topics include performance and the self; gender, marriage politics, and transgressive love; folk arts, transnational influences, and appropriation; ritual, religious transcendence, and death. All readings in English. No previous background required.

Instructors
Jidaigeki: Period Films in Japan (HA)
Subject associations
EAS 311

This course will survey jidaigeki--Japanese period films--from its prehistory to its return in the 21st century. We will pay attention to the works of geniuses of Japanese period film such as Masahiro Makino and Kurosawa Akira, but we will also study film in relation to broader political, economic, social and cultural contexts. In particular, we will consider various ways in which filmmakers, critics, and cultural policy makers of different backgrounds and ideological orientations have turned to jidaigeki in order to interrogate their historical present.

Instructors
Korean Women: Postmodern to Premodern (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 242 / GSS 243

This course focuses on the images of women in Korean cultural production, spanning from contemporary to pre-twentieth-century periods. Analyzing the historical variations in the notions of femininity that appear in literary and filmic texts, we will use these feminine images as access points to the aesthetic conundrums produced at crucial historical junctures. These feminine images, produced locally and globally, will allow us to examine the experiences of immigrant diaspora, Korea's neo-colonial relationship with the United States, the Korean War, colonial modernity, and Confucian patriarchal kinship.

Instructors
Operatic Cultures in Dialogue: An Introduction to Sinitic and Italian Opera (LA)
Subject associations
MUS 235 / EAS 235 / MTD 235

What makes a beautiful voice? How does spoken and sung language relate across cultural spaces? How are musical and bodily gestures codified differently across music theatrical traditions? This course takes a deep dive into these questions through a comparative exploration of two global manifestations of opera: Italian opera and Sinitic (Chinese-language) xiqu. We will consider such topics as gender and sexuality; nationalism and identity; scenic design, gesture and choreography; transmission and global circulation. Students will have the opportunity to attend at least one performance at the Metropolitan Opera or other venues in the area.

Instructors
Wendy Heller
Anna Yu Wang
Pro-Sem in Chinese & Japanese Studies: Literary and Historiographical Theories in East Asia
Subject associations
EAS 502

An introduction to the methodologies and theories in the study of East Asian literatures and histories

Readings in Japanese Academic Style II
Subject associations
EAS 564

The second half of the two-semester course, which trains students in reading the particular style of Japanese academic writing. The second semester particularly focuses on academic writings from Meiji to the 1950s, including brief introduction of necessary Classical Japanese Grammar for this purpose. Course conducted in English.

Instructors
Keiko Ono
Readings in Modern Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 402 / EAS 402

This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. While reading is under focus, speaking, listening, and writing are intensively practiced. Materials include novels, essays, articles, and films.

Instructors
Readings in Modern Korean II (LA)
Subject associations
KOR 407 / EAS 406

This course is designed (1) to advance students' literacy skills to the Superior level; (2) to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, literature and history; (3) to further develop their critical thinking through reading and writing in Korean; and (4) to encourage intercultural interaction through outreach projects. Focusing on change in the Korean language in relation to history, society, and culture, the course covers a wide range of sociocultural and political as well as sociolinguistic issues presented in classic short stories, poems, and historical texts.

Instructors
Remediating Monkey: Journey to the West (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 224 / ASA 223

This course focuses on the 16th-century Chinese novel Journey to the West (Monkey), some of its central themes, and its long history of adaptation across media, regional and historical boundaries. We read a good part of the 100-chapter novel, investigate some of the texts that preceded it, and look at the illustrations, comics, rewritings, films, and videogames that it inspired. If Monkey represents the spirit of play and the ability to change at will, how does remediation ask us to think about this in terms of media and philosophy, politics and language? When and how does adaptation turn into appropriation?

Instructors
Research Seminar in Ancient and Medieval Japanese History
Subject associations
EAS 526

This course is a research and writing seminar that introduces major historical methods of research in ancient and medieval Japan. In addition to weekly research assignments, students identify a research topic by the third week of the class, and complete a research paper at the end of the semester (entailing 15-20 pages). Instruction focuses on research methods and topics, although some reading of sources also occurs.

Instructors
Thomas D. Conlan
Ten Essential Topics in Chinese Art and Culture (HA)
Subject associations
ART 218 / EAS 238

What was the role of women in Chinese art? How did Chinese people think about this life and the afterlife? Why and how is calligraphy considered an art form in China? These are but three of the questions this course asks and endeavors to explore. Focusing on ten important and provocative topics, this course aims to provide a comprehensive but spotlighted picture of Chinese art and culture. Together the ten point to the interrelated nature of the visual and Chinese philosophical thought, aesthetic values, religious beliefs, social life, political expression and commercial practices.

Instructors
Cheng-hua Wang
The Japanese Print (LA)
Subject associations
ART 425 / EAS 425

ART 425 examines Japanese woodblock prints from the 17th - 19th century. We will consider the following: formal and technical aspects of prints; varied subject matter, including the "floating world" of the brothel districts and theatre; Japanese landscape and urban centers; and links between literature and prints, especially the re-working of classical literary themes in popular prints. The seminar will emphasize the study of prints in the university's Art Museum. Students will research Japanese prints from an art gallery in New York and recommend one for purchase for the Museum's collection.

Instructors
Andrew M. Watsky
The Qin Dynasty and the Beginnings of Empire in China (HA)
Subject associations
EAS 279 / HIS 276

This course tells the epic story of the people, ideas, and institutions that made the first Chinese empires, ca. third century BCE to the first century BCE. The course looks at the rise and fall of the Qin empire as well as the way Qin institutions and ideas reverberated through the succeeding Han dynasty--and beyond. Course will cover most recent archeological materials and excavated texts (in translation), including ongoing excavations of the terracotta warriors, funerary art, excavated legal codes, legal cases, religious and philosophical texts, and much more. Finally, we ask: did the Qin empire ever end?

Instructors
The Quest for Health: Contemporary Debates on Harm, Medicine, and Ethics
Subject associations
EAS 548 / ANT 548

The course explores issues in medicine and global health with a focus on ethics. We address both ethics in the context of clinical decision-making and also the social, cultural, and economic "ethical field" of health care. Ever-expanding technological possibilities re-shape our social lives, extending them, giving greater control but taking it away. Treatments such as living donor organ transplantation, stem cell therapies, and physician-assisted suicide transform our understandings of life, death and what we expect from one another. Technologies such as glucometers bring new inequalities.

Instructors
The Religions of China (EM)
Subject associations
REL 226 / EAS 226

A thematic introduction to Chinese religion, ranging from ancient to contemporary. The first half focuses on classics of Chinese philosophy (Book of Changes, Analects of Confucius, Daoist classics, etc.). The second half utilizes journalism, ethnography, films, social media, and author interviews to consider contemporary China, popular movements, state control of religion, cosmology, gods, saints, divination, gender, and ritual.

Instructors
Stephen F. Teiser
Women's Writing in Premodern China (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 347 / GSS 428

This course offers an introduction to writing by and about women in China from the Han dynasty (202 BCE-220 CE) to the end of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911). We will read both literary and historical sources to understand the development of representations of women as subjects in the early period, but the focus of the semester's readings will be on the innovations of women as writers from the Song through the Qing.

Instructors
Yalin Du

Chinese-Language Courses (Spring 2024)

Advanced Chinese: Contemporary Literature and Film (LA)
Subject associations
CHI 418

This is an advanced Chinese language class that incorporates contemporary Chinese literature and film. It is open to students who have completed at least three years of modern Chinese at the college level or the equivalent. The course is designed to improve students' Chinese language skills at a high level by using a wide range of texts, including literary texts, and films. The class is taught in Chinese and all discussions/homework will be in Chinese.

Elementary Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 102

Continuation of Chinese 101. To develop basic competence in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese.

Fifth-Year Modern Chinese II: Language and Culture in Contemporary China
Subject associations
CHI 452

A continuation of CHI 451, this advanced course in modern Chinese will further students' language comprehension, communication skills, and cultural understanding. Students will embark on a comprehensive exploration of contemporary Chinese society, delving into a wide array of linguistic topics, such the impact of societal development on the evolution of Chinese language, the rise of cultural awareness as reflected in linguistic behaviors in Chinese society, and the use of AI in language studies. Course curriculum will emphasize interactive discussions, diverse listening and speaking exercises, and project-based assignments.

Instructors
Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 404

A continuation of 403. This course consists of reading and discussion of selections from Chinese media on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.

Instructors
Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 406

This course consists of reading and discussion based on newspaper articles and essays by famous Chinese intellectuals on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Students will also be exposed to literary writings.

Instructors
Intensive Intermediate Chinese
Subject associations
CHI 108

An intensive course covering 105 and 107 in one semester for students who have finished 103 which covers 101 and 102. The course will emphasize reading and writing skills and the analysis of grammar. After 108, students are ready for third year courses.

Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 306

A continuation of 305, designed to further improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of essays published in contemporary Chinese newspapers and magazines.

Instructors
Intermediate Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 107

Continuing the intensive study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of modern cultural and social issues.

Introduction to Classical Chinese II (HA)
Subject associations
CHI 302

The purpose of this course is, first and foremost, to introduce the fundamental grammar of classical Chinese and to read short, original texts, from different periods and genres. It also provides theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as conceptions of filial piety, warfare, conflicts between righteousness and profit. Questions such as these were at the heart of Chinese intellectual debates.

Instructors
Introductory Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 1001

Introductory Chinese, (CHI 1001) and its subsequent course (CHI 1002), are introductory Chinese courses for true beginners. This course will be taught at half the pace of instruction compared to Elementary Chinese (CHI 101/CHI 102). The goal is to develop students' competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Both the Pinyin Romanization system and simplified characters will be used in class. After taking CHI 1001 and CHI 1002, students will develop basic abilities to handle simple survival situations in Chinese, to read and write over 300 Chinese characters, and be well prepared for more advanced and intensive study in Chinese.

Instructors
Third-Year Modern Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 304

A continuation of CHI 303, designed to improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of newspaper essays and commentaries.

Instructors

Japanese-Language Courses (Spring 2024)

Advanced Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 302

The course is designed to further students' proficiency in the four language skills aiming for ACTFL-ETS advanced level. Learning materials include the Japanese anime "Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi (Spirited Away)" and selected readings from works in the original language.

Elementary Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 102

Continuation of JPN 101, which emphasizes the basic four skills to achieve survival proficiency level.

Instructors
Integrative Advanced Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 306

Four skills approach to advanced Japanese with a focus on reading, listening and speaking. Reading materials include novels, essays, etc. Video materials are also used to enhance listening skills. The goal of this course is "advanced" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.

Instructors
Intermediate Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 107

The course aims at a thorough mastery of modern colloquial Japanese by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points covered in JPN 101, 102, and 105. It is also intended to give students advanced vocabulary and expressions through aural-oral drills, readings, and written exercises. Emphasis will increasingly be on reading, but oral work will still comprise a fundamental aspect of the course.

Instructors
Hisae Matsui
Introductory Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 1001

Introductory Japanese I (JPN 1001) and its subsequent course (JPN 1002), are introductory Japanese courses for true beginners. These courses will be taught at half the pace of instruction compared to a regular elementary Japanese course: JPN 101. This introductory course stresses oral-aural facility, but includes an introduction to written Japanese: hiragana, katakana and some basic kanji. After taking JPN 1001 and JPN 1002, students will develop basic abilities to handle simple survival situations in Japanese and be well prepared for the second half of regular elementary Japanese courses (JPN102) which is offered every spring term.

Readings in Classical Japanese (HA)
Subject associations
JPN 404

Selections from outstanding works of Classical Japanese prose and verse from Nara to early Showa period, particularly in the genres of history, philosophy, and poetry.

Instructors
Keiko Ono
Readings in Modern Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 402 / EAS 402

This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. While reading is under focus, speaking, listening, and writing are intensively practiced. Materials include novels, essays, articles, and films.

Instructors

Korean-language courses (Spring 2024)

Advanced Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 302

A continuation of KOR 301. Continued development of proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing through readings and discussions, focusing on increasing complexity and variety of language, as well as depth. Readings include different styles of writings on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history. Intercultural communications and understandings are emphasized.

Instructors
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture II (LA)
Subject associations
KOR 402

Reading and discussion of thoughts and issues within contemporary Korean society. Readings are drawn from a variety of sociocultural and historical as well as sociolinguistic topics including family, marriage, gender issues, education, technology, and the changes in the languages of both South and North Korea. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.

Instructors
Elementary Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 102

A continuation of KOR 101. Continued development of proficiency in basic communication by balancing four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Integrative Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 308

This course is a continuation of KOR 303, focusing on stabilizing literacy development through a variety of authentic reading materials, class discussions, presentations and various writing assignments. Intercultural competence will be developed through community engagement in academic and real-world contexts. Expanding advanced-level vocabulary based on Chinese characters is also emphasized.

Instructors
Intensive Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 108

A continuation of Korean 103. This course covers Intermediate Korean material, focusing on complex grammatical structures, reading, and writing. Journals are kept for writing practice. Students who have successfully completed KOR 103 and 108 are placed in KOR 301 for further practice of conversation. Those with strong conversational skills may also test into KOR 303, Integrative Korean, which focuses more on literacy.

Instructors
Intermediate Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 107

A continuation of KOR 105. Continued development of four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in Korean. Complex grammatical structures are taught while the basics are reviewed. Idiomatic expressions are introduced. Journals are kept for writing practice.

Instructors
Readings in Modern Korean II (LA)
Subject associations
KOR 407 / EAS 406

This course is designed (1) to advance students' literacy skills to the Superior level; (2) to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, literature and history; (3) to further develop their critical thinking through reading and writing in Korean; and (4) to encourage intercultural interaction through outreach projects. Focusing on change in the Korean language in relation to history, society, and culture, the course covers a wide range of sociocultural and political as well as sociolinguistic issues presented in classic short stories, poems, and historical texts.

Instructors