Courses

EAS Courses (Fall 2019)

Writing and Culture of Premodern Korea
This course is an introductory survey of the cultural history of premodern Korea-from early times until the turn of the twentieth century-focused on the primary sources. We will read various original materials (in English translation): myths, state histories, diaries, travelogues, and works of fiction, among others. Topics covered in this course include the imagination of the origins in myth, the idea of Confucian governance, everyday life and entertainment in Choson (1392-1910), and Korea's opening to the west in the late nineteenth century.
Instructors: Ksenia Chizhova
Japanese Society and Culture
During the latter part of the 20th century, Japan became the world's second largest economy and a highly technologized, wealthy, and ordered society. While Americans once regarded Japan as a land of "corporate warriors," in the 21st century, scholars are looking to Japan to understand global issues such as labor instability, environmentalism, longevity, and the demographic crisis related to rapid aging. We explore key social issues in Japan today including gender equality, labor, school-to-work transition, public health, and popular cultural critiques of modernity and technology.
Instructors: Amy Beth Borovoy
Chinese Cinemas
This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese cinemas in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. From postwar musicals and pan-Asian blockbusters, to new wave avant-garde films and experimental documentaries, the diversity of Chinese cinemas reflects cinema's relations to global capitalism, Asia's democratization movements, financial crises, and the arrival of (post)socialism. Creating urban nomads, songstresses, daydreamers, travelers, and terrorists, Chinese cinemas put on full display the forces of globalization in shaping the aesthetics and politics of film. Selections broadly include popular commercial films to rare art house productions.
Instructors: Erin Yu-Tien Huang
Japan's Media Mix: Anime/Cinema/Gaming
This course surveys Japan's vibrant media mix cultures spanning the histories of anime, cinema and gaming through the intersections of film and media studies. Charting the emergence of media mix cultures and "new" media technologies from silent film to augmented reality in Japan, this course introduces students to major works of anime (animated feature films, television series, and other formats), cinema, and video games. We will examine the changing contours of work and play, sentiment and sensation, thought and materiality, and the forms of mediation and social relation that defined Japan's modern media mix ecologies and platforms.
Instructors: Franz K. Prichard
Junior Seminar
This seminar teaches the research and writing skills needed to produce a thesis as an East Asian studies major. Through mini-projects and guest lectures, the class introduces the various disciplines and methodologies used to study East Asia, including history, anthropology, political science, history, literature, and media studies. In addition, the class teaches techniques of research and writing: how to formulate a research question, find and use appropriate sources, write a research proposal, craft a compelling introduction and convincing conclusion.
Empire to Nation: 20th Century Japanese Fiction and Film
This course will examine modern Japanese fiction and film that engaged with Japan's shift from "empire" to "nation" (roughly from 1930s to 1960s) with a specific focus on identity formation via race, ethnicity, and nationalism.
Instructors: Atsuko Ueda
The Warrior Culture of Japan
In addition to providing a better understanding of the judicial and military underpinnings of Japan's military 'rule' and the nature of medieval warfare, the course shows how warriors have been perceived as a dominant force in Japanese history, and will explore how the samurai myth was created in more recent times. The goals of this course are to examine the role of warriors in Japanese history, to introduce of historical debates concerning this topic, and to explore the use of primary sources in translation.
Instructors: Thomas Donald Conlan
Modern China
Students will acquire a broad understanding of China's history over the past three centuries, with an emphasis on the last 120 years. Following a brief overview of the broad sweep of Chinese history, we will learn about China's last dynasty, the Qing; about the rapid political, social, cultural, and economic changes that began in the mid-nineteenth century; and about the complexities and contradictions of China's twentieth century. We will consider how modern China has been shaped both by long-range trends and by key events and individuals. In doing so, we will also question some frequent assumptions about China, its past, and its present.
Intellectual History of China to the Fifth Century
Critical consideration of a selection of monumental contributions to early Chinese thought, and the uses to which they were put by later Chinese thinkers. Readings will be from English translations such as: [Analects],[ Lao-tzu], [Chuang-tzu], [Mencius],[ I-ching] and secondary works. All assignments are available on reserve.
Instructors: Willard James Peterson
Early China: Text and Bibliography in Early China
The seminar examines the gradual evolution of early Chinese textuality from the pre-imperial through the early imperial period, with particular emphasis on questions of materiality and sociology of text; authorship, compilation, and circulation; canon formation and the rise of commentary; and classification and bibliography. Readings are in classical Chinese and in various languages of modern scholarship. Languages of instruction: English and Chinese.
Instructors: Martin Kern, Jianwei Xu
Chinese Intellectual History
Methods, sources, and problems of research in history of Chinese thought.
Instructors: Willard James Peterson
Sources in Ancient and Medieval Japanese History
This course provides an introduction to the written sources of Japanese history from 750- 1600. Instruction focuses on reading and translating a variety of documentary genres, and court chronicles, although visual sources (e.g. maps, scrolls, and screens) are introduced in class as well. Each week entails a translation of five or six short documents and a library research assignment. Research resources and methods are also emphasized. A substantial research assignment, involving primary source research, is due at the end of the semester. The final week of class is devoted to presentations about the research project.
Instructors: Thomas Donald Conlan
Readings in Chinese Literature: Ballads, Songs, & Lyrics of Tang & Song
Examines complex history of song forms in the Tang & Song dynasties, including Music Bureau poetry, forms known as gexing, and beginnings of the song lyric (ci) tradition. Focus is on the nexus of social, cultural, and literary history of these different generic traditions, examining the intersection of song forms and political and social criticism as one catalyst in the development and transformation of song forms. We scrutinize the impact of social class transformation and expression on the history of song. Authors: Gao Shi, Cen Shen, Li Bai, Du Fu, Bai Juyi, Yuan Zhen, Li He, Wen Tingyun, Yan Shu, Ouyang Xiu, and Liu Yong.
Instructors: Anna Marshall Shields
Readings in Chinese Literature: Dream of the Red Chamber
This course focuses on the 18th-century novel Dream of the Red Chamber in its historical and cultural context. We read not only a good part of the novel, but also investigate its sequels, as well as its adaptations. We employ different editions, look carefully at illustrations, and investigate the novel's commentaries and multi-media adaptations. In addition, we use the novel to investigate crucial aspects of Qing dynasty culture - opera, games, rumor and gossip, material culture, and discourses of sex, death, and emotion. How did these cultural discourses help to structure the text in terms of content, form, and ideology?
Instructors: Pieter Christiaan Aize Keulemans
Japan Anthropology in Historical Perspective
The course concerns Japan studies in the context of theories of capitalism, personhood, democracy, gender, and modernity. We consider the emergence of Japan as a place to think with in the American social sciences after World War II and the development of ideas about area studies in the context of the Cold War and post Cold War conjunctures. Additionally the course considers topics in which Japan are relevant to thinking about global issues, including global capitalism, temporary labor, biopolitics, environmental consciousness, media culture and consumer culture, work-life balance, and the demographic crisis related to rapid aging.
Instructors: Amy Beth Borovoy
Japanese Film and Media Studies: Dispossession, Documentary, and the Geopolitics of Image Media
This course examines the vivid perspectives of Japanese documentary media from 1945 to present as the focal point of our consideration of the geopolitics of image media. We will explore major documentary works that critically engage issues of cultural identity, environmental devastation, regional community, and historical memory to raise questions about the changing prospects and politics of image media. Our shifting focal points will capture key transformations in the archipelago's urban and media environments from the dynamic views of Japan's most influential writers, critics, and media practitioners.
Instructors: Franz K. Prichard

Chinese-language courses (Fall 2019)

Elementary Chinese I
An introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese, emphasizing oral-aural facility and the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Instructors: Jing Wang
Intensive Elementary Chinese
Chinese 103 is designed for students who already have some familiarity with spoken Mandarin or any Chinese dialect. This course will emphasize the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Intermediate Chinese I
While reinforcing the knowledge students have acquired thus far, this course will further develop the students' audio-lingual proficiency and bring their reading and writing ability to a higher level.
Introduction to Classical Chinese I
Chinese 301 provides basic training for students in classical Chinese and introduces students to theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as the concept of Dao, life and death, Confucian ethics, etc. Each theme consists of passages selected from Chinese classics and short essays or stories full of wisdom and wit from later dynasties. This course will not only improve your four skills in Chinese language (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) but also enhances your general understanding of traditional Chinese philosophy and culture.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou
Third-Year Modern Chinese I
Designed to further develop the student's overall language skills through reading and discussion of contemporary issues published in Chinese media.
Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese I
Chinese 305 will further develop student's overall language skills through readings and discussion of contemporary issues published in Chinese media. This course is designed for students who have familiarity with spoken Mandarin or any Chinese dialect.
Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I
This course consists of reading and discussion of selections from Chinese media on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.
Instructors: Jing Wang
Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I
This course consists of reading and discussion based on newspaper articles and essays by famous Chinese intellectuals on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Students will also be exposed to literary writings.
Readings in Modern Chinese Intellectual History
This course is designed for students who have had advanced training in modern Chinese. The focus of readings is modern Chinese intellectual history. Topics that will be discussed include language reform, women's emancipation, the encounter of western civilization, the rise of communism, etc.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou

Japanese-language courses (Fall 2019)

Elementary Japanese I
An intensive introduction to modern Japanese stressing oral-aural facility, but including an introduction to written Japanese.
Instructors: Hisae Matsui, Shinji Sato, Tomoko Shibata, Yukari Tokumasu
Intermediate Japanese I
This course aims to give a thorough mastery of modern colloquial Japanese (Tokyo speech) by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points and more advanced vocabulary and grammar. Students will reinforce four major skills by using speaking - listening drills, readings, and written exercises.
Instructors: Hisae Matsui, Tomoko Shibata, Megumi Watanabe
Advanced Japanese I
This course is designed to further students' reading ability. Students will have ample opportunity to hear and use increasingly more sophisticated vocabulary and grammatical constructions through discussion and composition. Japanese video will also be incorporated into the course. Reading materials include "Tobira" and selected readings from works in the original language.
Instructors: Yukari Tokumasu, Megumi Watanabe
Integrative Advanced Japanese I
This course focuses on speaking, reading, listening, and writing with the goal of preparing students to continue on to JPN 306 in the Spring. Reading materials include novels, essays, etc. Video materials are also used to enhance listening skills. The goal of this course is "advanced" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors: Tomoko Shibata
Readings in Modern Japanese I
This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. Students will (1) discuss various issues using dramas, short novels and editorials, and (2) learn business Japanese. Through these activities, students will develop critical thinking skills as well as Japanese language skills.
Instructors: Yukari Tokumasu
Contemporary Japanese Language and Culture I
This course emphasizes continued development of the four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) used in academic or professional settings. Materials include novels, essays, reports, films, and documentaries. The goal of this course is "superior" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors: Shinji Sato

Korean-language courses (Fall 2019)

Elementary Korean I
Elementary Korean is designed for beginning students who intend to build a solid foundation for further study in the Korean language. The course provides four balanced language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - needed for basic communication. It emphasizes the ability to use Korean appropriately and introduces students to useful information concerning culture and daily life in Korea.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, Yuseon Yun
Elementary Korean I
Elementary Korean is designed for beginning students who intend to build a solid foundation for further study in the Korean language. The course provides four balanced language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - needed for basic communication. It emphasizes the ability to use Korean appropriately and introduces students to useful information concerning culture and daily life in Korea.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, Yuseon Yun
Intensive Korean I
The first part of Intensive Korean is designed for heritage students who have already had considerable amount of exposure to the Korean language and culture but have not received any formal instruction before their arriving at Princeton. It covers the Elementary Korean material focusing on vocabulary building, grammar, reading and writing.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Intensive Korean I
The first part of Intensive Korean is designed for heritage students who have already had considerable amount of exposure to the Korean language and culture but have not received any formal instruction before their arriving at Princeton. It covers the Elementary Korean material focusing on vocabulary building, grammar, reading and writing.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Intermediate Korean I
Intermediate Korean is designed for students who have learned the basics of the Korean language and want to improve their language skills. Complex sentences and grammar are covered while the basics are reviewed. Balancing four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- is emphasized.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji
Intermediate Korean I
Intermediate Korean is designed for students who have learned the basics of the Korean language and want to improve their language skills. Complex sentences and grammar are covered while the basics are reviewed. Balancing four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- is emphasized.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji
Advanced Korean I
Advanced Korean is designed to develop fluency in both oral and literary skills. Expansion of vocabulary, practice in reading comprehension as well as active skills of conversation and writing are stressed through short readings and class discussion. Readings include different styles of writings on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi
Advanced Korean I
Advanced Korean is designed to develop fluency in both oral and literary skills. Expansion of vocabulary, practice in reading comprehension as well as active skills of conversation and writing are stressed through short readings and class discussion. Readings include different styles of writings on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi
Integrative Korean I
This fourth-year Korean course is designed to promote students' proficiency to the advanced-mid level and to enhance their continued development of literacy skills in Korean. Various authentic reading materials are reviewed in class discussion, presentation skills are emphasized, and a wider range of formal vocabulary is introduced.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji
Integrative Korean I
This fourth-year Korean course is designed to promote students' proficiency to the advanced-mid level and to enhance their continued development of literacy skills in Korean. Various authentic reading materials are reviewed in class discussion, presentation skills are emphasized, and a wider range of formal vocabulary is introduced.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture I
This fifth-year language course is designed to accelerate students' proficiency to the high-advanced level to promote a deeper level of understanding of contemporary Korea and its people. A wide range of social, cultural and economic issues are covered through the use of various media resources (e.g., dramas, films, songs, commercials, newspapers, websites) as well as short essays. Classroom discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture I
This fifth-year language course is designed to accelerate students' proficiency to the high-advanced level to promote a deeper level of understanding of contemporary Korea and its people. A wide range of social, cultural and economic issues are covered through the use of various media resources (e.g., dramas, films, songs, commercials, newspapers, websites) as well as short essays. Classroom discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Readings in Modern Korean l
This sixth-year Korean course is designed to advance students' reading and writing skills to the superior level and to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, culture, society, and history. Readings cover various types of authentic materials (e.g., newspaper articles, editorials, think pieces, essays, and contemporary literary short stories). Discussion and presentation skills in formal settings (e.g., academic, professional) are also emphasized. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi
Readings in Modern Korean l
This sixth-year Korean course is designed to advance students' reading and writing skills to the superior level and to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, culture, society, and history. Readings cover various types of authentic materials (e.g., newspaper articles, editorials, think pieces, essays, and contemporary literary short stories). Discussion and presentation skills in formal settings (e.g., academic, professional) are also emphasized. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi

EAS Courses (Spring 2019)

Chinese Cinemas
This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese cinemas in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. From postwar musicals and pan-Asian blockbusters, to new wave avant-garde films and experimental documentaries, the diversity of Chinese cinemas reflects cinema's relations to global capitalism, Asia's democratization movements, financial crises, and the arrival of (post)socialism. Creating urban nomads, songstresses, daydreamers, travelers, and terrorists, Chinese cinemas put on full display the forces of globalization in shaping the aesthetics and politics of film. Selections broadly include popular commercial films to rare art house productions.
Instructors: Erin Yu-Tien Huang
Imagining Sounds of China: Encounters and Fantasies
Chinese culture and history contain an abundance of sounds with distinctive timbres. They have been experienced, imagined and theorized locally and in cross-cultural dialogues. People from different times and cultures often experience them in mediated forms such as literary and graphic descriptions. This course offers an introduction to these sonic phenomena. Comparative and transmedia approaches are used to tackle their multicultural repercussions while giving equal attention to their socio-historic contexts. Students will gain an overview of the Chinese soundscape, aided by methods of sound studies and literary/cultural criticism.
Instructors: Guangchen Chen, Pieter Christiaan Aize Keulemans
The Passionate Eye: Documentary Film in East Asia
The seminar will encourage students to think critically about the documentary as artistic medium and as socio-political practice. Some important questions will focus on the form itself: who has produced and watched these films and through what sorts of technologies? What are the codes through which documentaries make sense of their subjects and how do these change? Other questions will have wider scope: how can filmmaking impact politics and culture? How does it deal with the gap between reality and representation? What are the ethical issues of such work? What, if anything, is distinct about the life of documentary films in East Asia?
Instructors: Steven Chung
Mind, Body, and Bioethics in Japan and Beyond
The seminar will examine key concepts of the mind, the body, and the nature-culture distinction. We will study these issues in the context of Japanese beliefs about the good society, making connections between "lay culture," Japanese notions of social democracy, and "science culture." Topics include: diagnosis and care of the mentally ill, the politics of disability, notions of human life and death, responses to bio-technology, organ transfer, citizen science, cultural definitions of addiction and co-dependency, and the ethics of human enhancement.
Instructors: Amy Beth Borovoy
Intellectual History of China from the Ninth to the 19th Century
The course centers on the changing role of the intellectual elite -- how they were recruited, their relationship to holders of powers, their attitudes toward the past and their cultural heritage. The aim of the course is to provide a clearer understanding of the burdens and privileges of intellectuals in Chinese society.
Instructors: Willard James Peterson
Topics in the Anthropology of Japan
The course considers ethnographies from postwar to present that attempt to make sense of Japanese society through specific theoretical prisms and historical moments. The course also considers Japan as a site to study pressing social issues of global relevance: including foodways and food culture; aging and longevity; public health, work/life balance, and community environments; and global capital.
Instructors: Amy Beth Borovoy
Chinese Intellectual History
Methods, sources, and problems of research in Chinese thought, including examination of some broad interpretations of intellectual development of China. A reading knowledge of Chinese or Japanese is required for the study of selected problems areas through seminar discussion, oral reports, and research papers.
Instructors: Willard James Peterson
Readings in Chinese Literature: Miscellanies and Anecdote Collections
This course examines the compilation, contents, and circulation of various types of prose collections in the Tang and Song dynasties, in forms ranging from miscellanies to anecdote collections and other types of notebook. We begin by considering the pre-Tang models for such collections, but then focus primarily on texts of the late 8th through 12th centuries. Rather than focusing on genre definitions or hard boundaries among forms, we explore continuities of motive, contents, and shared world views among different collections. Where useful, we read theoretical scholarship on the practices of collecting and literary bricolage.
Instructors: Anna Marshall Shields
Readings in Chinese Literature: Chinese Theater, 900-1900
An introduction to Chinese opera from the Song until the Republican period. Opera texts are read in conjunction with issues pertinent to cultural history: the architectural history of the stage, the urban and rural environment of opera, the global circulation of opera, the relationship between religious ritual and literary performance, as well as issues of physicality, sexuality, gender, patronage, and class. Primary texts include the Yuan opera Zhao shi gu er (and the Voltaire play Orphelin de la Chine), Tang Xianzu's Mudan ting, Li Yu's Qingzhong pu, Kong Shangren's Taohua shan, and Chen Sen's novel Pinhua baojian.
Instructors: Pieter Christiaan Aize Keulemans
Chang'an: China's Medieval Metropolis
With a walled city of thirty square miles and a population of more than one million, Chang'an, capital of the Tang dynasty, was the largest city in the world at the time. Through reading texts in different genres including official history, governmental documents, literary collections, anecdotes, legal codes, and stone inscriptions along with secondary scholarship, this course introduces the political, ritual, and economic structures of the city, and explores the lives of its citizens that in different ways either maintained or challenged these structures.
Instructors: Xin Wen
Photographic Thought/Sensation/Materiality in Japanese Literary and Visual Media
As a vital medium of relation and exchange among mental and material worlds, photography has inflected the entangled conditions of possibility for literary and visual media in Japan in untold ways. This course examines the evolving contours of thought, sensation, and materiality provoked by the photographic encounters among a diverse set of textual and visual practices. Drawing on primary materials and criticism from literary and artistic contexts as well as secondary scholarship, this course explores the changing relations among media and moments of critical reflection afforded by photography in Japan.
Instructors: Franz K. Prichard
Marx and His Readers
No description available
Instructors: Federico Marcon
Continuity and Discontinuity in the Intellectual History of Late Imperial China
No description available
Instructors: Willard James Peterson
Eminent Individuals Dealing with Troubles in Late Qing and Early Republican China
No description available
Instructors: Willard James Peterson
Textual Transmission and Lineage Construction in Early China
No description available
Instructors: Willard James Peterson

Chinese-language courses (Spring 2019)

Elementary Chinese II
Continuation of Chinese 101. To develop basic competence in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese.
Instructors: Yike Li, Ying Ou, Jing Wang, Ding Wang-Bramlett, Jing Xie
Intermediate Chinese II
Continuing the intensive study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of modern cultural and social issues.
Instructors: Ning Liu, Jue Lu, Xiang Lv, Fang Yan
Intensive Intermediate Chinese
An intensive course covering 105 and 107 in one semester for students who have finished 103 which covers 101 and 102. The course will emphasize reading and writing skills and the analysis of grammar. After 108, students are ready for third year courses.
Instructors: Wei Gong, Ning Liu
Introduction to Classical Chinese II
The purpose of this course is, first and foremost, to introduce the fundamental grammar of classical Chinese and to read short, original texts, from different periods and genres. It also provides theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as conceptions of filial piety, warfare, conflicts between righteousness and profit. Questions such as these were at the heart of Chinese intellectual debates.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou, Yike Li, Xin Zou
Third-Year Modern Chinese II
A continuation of CHI 303, designed to improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of newspaper essays and commentaries.
Instructors: Luanfeng Huang, Xin Zou
Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese II
A continuation of 305, designed to further improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of essays published in contemporary Chinese newspapers and magazines.
Instructors: Wei Gong, Ding Wang-Bramlett
Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II
A continuation of 403. This course consists of reading and discussion of selections from Chinese media on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.
Instructors: Xiang Lv, Fang Yan
Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II
This course consists of reading and discussion based on newspaper articles and essays by famous Chinese intellectuals on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Students will also be exposed to literary writings.
Instructors: Ying Ou, Jing Xie
Readings in Classic Chinese Short Stories
Focuses on reading and discussing selections from Feng Menglong's Sanyan, the most popular and well-known collection of Classic Chinese short stories published in the late sixteenth century. One class, two hours of discussion, conducted in Chinese.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou, Jue Lu
Advanced Chinese: Contemporary Literature and Film
This is an advanced Chinese language class that incorporates contemporary Chinese literature and film. It is open to students who have completed at least three years of modern Chinese at the college level or the equivalent. The course is designed to improve students' Chinese language skills at a high level by using a wide range of texts, including literary texts, and films. The class is taught in Chinese and all discussions/homework will be in Chinese.
Instructors: Luanfeng Huang, Jing Wang

Japanese-language courses (Spring 2019)

Elementary Japanese II
Continuation of JPN 101, which emphasizes the basic four skills to achieve survival proficiency level.
Instructors: Shinji Sato, Tomoko Shibata, Yukari Tokumasu, Megumi Watanabe
Intermediate Japanese II
The course aims at a thorough mastery of modern colloquial Japanese by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points covered in JPN 101, 102, and 105. It is also intended to give students advanced vocabulary and expressions through aural-oral drills, readings, and written exercises. Emphasis will increasingly be on reading, but oral work will still comprise a fundamental aspect of the course.
Instructors: Hisae Matsui, Yukari Tokumasu
Advanced Japanese II
The course is designed to further students' proficiency in the four language skills aiming for ACTFL-ETS advanced level. Learning materials include the Japanese anime "Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi (Spirited Away)" and selected readings from works in the original language.
Instructors: Hisae Matsui, Megumi Watanabe
Integrative Advanced Japanese II
Four skills approach to advanced Japanese with a focus on reading, listening and speaking. Reading materials include novels, essays, etc. Video materials are also used to enhance listening skills. The goal of this course is "advanced" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors: Tomoko Shibata
Readings in Modern Japanese II
This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. While reading is under focus, speaking, listening, and writing are intensively practiced. Materials include novels, essays, articles, and films.
Instructors: Yukari Tokumasu
Contemporary Japanese Language and Culture II
This course emphasizes continued development of four skills used in academic or professional settings. Materials include novels, essays, reports, films, and documentaries.The goal of this course is "superior" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors: Shinji Sato, Tomoko Shibata

Korean-language courses (Spring 2019)

Elementary Korean II
A continuation of KOR 101. Continued development of proficiency in basic communication by balancing four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, Yuseon Yun
Elementary Korean II
A continuation of KOR 101. Continued development of proficiency in basic communication by balancing four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, David Chung, Yuseon Yun
Intermediate Korean II
A continuation of KOR 105. Continued development of four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in Korean. Complex grammatical structures and irregularities are taught while the basics are reviewed. Idiomatic expressions are introduced. Journals are kept for writing practice.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji, Jae Rim Yoon
Intermediate Korean II
A continuation of KOR 105. Continued development of four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in Korean. Complex grammatical structures and irregularities are taught while the basics are reviewed. Idiomatic expressions are introduced. Journals are kept for writing practice.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji, Jae Rim Yoon
Intensive Korean II
A continuation of Korean 103. This course covers Intermediate Korean material, focusing on complex grammatical structures, reading, and writing. Journals are kept for writing practice. Students who have successfully completed KOR 103 and 108 are placed in KOR 301 for further practice of conversation. Those with strong conversational skills may also test into KOR 303, Integrative Korean, which focuses more on literacy.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji
Intensive Korean II
A continuation of Korean 103. This course covers Intermediate Korean material, focusing on complex grammatical structures, reading, and writing. Journals are kept for writing practice. Students who have successfully completed KOR 103 and 108 are placed in KOR 301 for further practice of conversation. Those with strong conversational skills may also test into KOR 303, Integrative Korean, which focuses more on literacy.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji
Advanced Korean II
A continuation of KOR 301. Continued development of proficiency in speaking and reading through short readings and class discussion. Vocabulary learning and discourse skills are emphasized.
Instructors: David Chung, Jae Rim Yoon
Advanced Korean II
A continuation of KOR 301. Continued development of proficiency in speaking and reading through short readings and class discussion. Vocabulary learning and discourse skills are emphasized.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, Jae Rim Yoon
Integrative Korean II
This course is a continuation of KOR303, focusing on stabilizing literacy development through a variety of authentic reading materials, class discussions, presentations and various writing assignments. Expanding advanced-level vocabulary based on Chinese characters is also emphasized.
Instructors: Jae Rim Yoon
Integrative Korean II
This course is a continuation of KOR303, focusing on stabilizing literacy development through a variety of authentic reading materials, class discussions, presentations and various writing assignments. Expanding advanced-level vocabulary based on Chinese characters is also emphasized.
Instructors: Jae Rim Yoon
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture II
Reading and discussion of thoughts and issues within contemporary Korean society. Readings are drawn from a variety of sociocultural and historical as well as sociolinguistic topics including family, marriage, education, technology, and the changes of the Korean language. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture II
Reading and discussion of thoughts and issues within contemporary Korean society. Readings are drawn from a variety of sociocultural and historical as well as sociolinguistic topics including family, marriage, education, technology, and the changes of the Korean language. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Readings in Modern Korean II
This course is designed (1) to advance students' literacy skills to the Superior level; (2) to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, literature and history; and (3) to further develop their critical thinking through reading and writing in Korean. Focusing on change in the Korean language in relation to history, society, and culture, the course covers a wide range of sociocultural and political as well as sociolinguistic issues presented in classic short stories, poems, and historical texts.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi
Readings in Modern Korean II
This course is designed (1) to advance students' literacy skills to the Superior level; (2) to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, literature and history; and (3) to further develop their critical thinking through reading and writing in Korean. Focusing on change in the Korean language in relation to history, society, and culture, the course covers a wide range of sociocultural and political as well as sociolinguistic issues presented in classic short stories, poems, and historical texts.