Courses

EAS courses (Spring 2018)

Manga: Visual Culture in Modern Japan
This course examines the comic book as an expressive medium in Japan. Reading a range of works, classic and contemporary, in a variety of genres, we consider: How has the particular history of Japan shaped cartooning as an art form there? What critical approaches can help us think productively about comics (and other popular culture)? How can we translate the effects of a visual medium into written scholarly language? What do changes in media technology, literacy, and distribution mean for comics today? Coursework will combine readings, written analysis, and technical exercises. All readings in English. No fine arts experience required.
Instructors: Brian R. Steininger
The Origins of Japanese Culture and Civilization: A History of Japan until 1600
This course is designed to introduce the culture and history of Japan, and to examine how one understands and interprets the past. In addition to considering how a culture, a society, and a state develop, we will try to reconstruct the tenor of life in "ancient" and "medieval" Japan and chart how patterns of Japanese civilization shifted through time.
Instructors: Thomas Donald Conlan
Old Novels, New Media: The Three Kingdoms as History, Fiction, and Video Game
How does a two-thousand-year-old story transform into a video game? Why do Chinese women continue to write fan-fiction about a story that is so outdated and masculine? This class investigates a tale of ancient China, The Three Kingdoms, tracing its changes through time, across nations, and different media. The story began as history in the 3rd century, but was soon adapted to a variety of media: poetry, opera, novel, film, TV-series, popular songs, and video-games. By investigating different incarnations of the Three Kingdoms legend, this class explores the ways in which the ancient story was adapted, remaining popular until today.
Instructors: Pieter Christiaan Aize Keulemans, Yiyi Luo
Introduction to Chinese Literature
An introduction to some of the most important texts, writers, and topics of Classical Literature from antiquity through the Song dynasty. All readings are in English, and no previous background in Chinese or Asian culture is required. Topics include: nature of the Chinese language; the beginnings of poetry; development of narrative and historical writing; classical Chinese poetics; literature of protest, dissent, and political satire; love poetry; religious and philosophical ideas in Chinese literature.
Instructors: Anna Marshall Shields
Chinese Cinemas
This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese cinemas in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. From postwar musicals and pan-Asian blockbusters, to new wave avant-garde films and experimental documentaries, the diversity of Chinese cinemas reflects cinema's relations to global capitalism, Asia's democratization movements, financial crises, and the arrival of (post)socialism. Creating urban nomads, songstresses, daydreamers, travelers, and terrorists, Chinese cinemas put on full display the forces of globalization in shaping the aesthetics and politics of film. Selections broadly include popular commercial films to rare art house productions.
Instructors: Erin Yu-Tien Huang
Nomadic Empires: From the Scythian Confederation to the Mongol Conquest
In telling histories of East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and Europe, various groups of nomadic people often loomed large in the background and served as the foil to the travail of their sedentary neighbors. In this course we put the nomadic peoples of Inner Asia front and center, and ask how the nomadic way of life and mode of state building served as agents of change in pre-modern Eurasia.
Instructors: Xin Wen
Mind, Body, and Bioethics in Japan and Beyond
The seminar will examine key concepts of the mind, the body, and the nature-culture distinction. We will study these issues in the context of Japanese beliefs about the good society, making connections between "lay culture," Japanese notions of social democracy, and "science culture." Topics include: diagnosis and care of the mentally ill, the politics of disability, notions of human life and death, responses to bio-technology, the management of human materials such as organs, cultural definitions of addiction and co-dependency, and the ethics of human enhancement.
Instructors: Amy Beth Borovoy
Dangerous Bodies: Cross-Dressing, Asia, Transgression
This course examines "dangerous bodies" - bodies that transgress existing gender and racial norms in Chinese and Sinophone cultures. Situated at the intersection of literary, film, performance, gender and ethnic studies, this course provides an introduction to the shifting social meanings of the body in relation to historical masculinity, femininity, and Chineseness. We examine different cross-dressed figures, ranging from Mulan, cross-dressed male opera singer, WWII Japanese/Chinese spy, to experimental queer cinema, in a study that unpacks whether these transgressive bodies represent social change or a tool for restoring traditional norms.
Instructors: Erin Yu-Tien Huang
Korean Travel Narratives, 1100s-1930s
Knowledge about the world transformed over history: civilization, empire, East-West encounter, and postcolonial homelessness are frames that link identity and space. Reading travelogues by Koreans and about Korea, we will pursue two goals. We will analyze the epistemic coordinates of travelogue that produces knowledge about self and other. And we will note the changing historical contexts around Korea, which defined the modes of mobility for shipwreck survivors, prisoners of war, Christian missionaries, Japanese colonial officials, and communist guerilla fighters. Korea will provide us with a concrete vantage point upon the larger world.
Instructors: Ksenia Chizhova
Conversion, Media and the Cold War in Asia
The seminar explores conversion in media discourses and practices of the Cold War, with a focus on Asia. Conversion is approached as a protean figure spanning religious doctrine, forces of economic mobility, cross-cultural encounters, and states of political subjectivity. Its media forms include portrayals of brainwashing, control of networks and content, and ideas about media's hypnotic power. The seminar inquires into how conversion attained heightened conceptual force during the Cold War and will examine quasi-scientific notions of brainwashing, the proliferation of religious cults, and the hardening of ideological binarism.
Instructors: Steven Chung
Love and Violence through Words: Modern Chinese Literature in the Age of Revolution
This course will introduce you to important works in modern Chinese literature from late 19th century to the present, which have served as tools of propaganda, national defense, cultural revolution, self-fashioning, gender-conscious communication, or complete depoliticization. Therefore, the multiple literary genres of novel, folklore tale, theater and poetry will be analyzed against related forms of film, opera, music-drama and painting. Our reading of the texts will be set in the context of the turbulent twentieth century, through which you will also gain a comprehensive understanding of the critical moments in modern Chinese history.
Instructors: Guangchen Chen
Intellectual History of China from the Ninth to the 19th Century
The course centers on the changing role of the intellectual elite -- how they were recruited, their relationship to holders of powers, their attitudes toward the past and their cultural heritage. The aim of the course is to provide a clearer understanding of the burdens and privileges of intellectuals in Chinese society.
Instructors: Willard James Peterson
Chinese Intellectual History
Methods, sources, and problems of research in Chinese thought, including examination of some broad interpretations of intellectual development of China. A reading knowledge of Chinese or Japanese is required for the study of selected problems areas through seminar discussion, oral reports, and research papers.
Instructors: Willard James Peterson
Readings in East Asian Film and Media
The seminar explores major and recent writing in English on East Asian film and media. Its aim is to deepen participant knowledge of the theoretical orientations, critical debates, and historical research within the emerging and fluid field. Monographs and key edited volumes will make up the core readings, supplemented by both standalone critical writing and film and media texts.
Instructors: Steven Chung
Readings in Chinese Literature: Literary Anthologies, Collections, and Collectanea
This course examines the practices of collecting and anthologizing literary texts in a wide variety of forms during the Tang and Song dynasties. We begin by looking at a range of pre-Tang models for collecting literary material in different forms and consider their different approaches to compilation, including selection criteria, and organization, and then examine the impact of their choices on canonization and transmission. We study collection practices in state-sponsored anthologies; in primers and literary composition guides in individual literary collections; and finally in large collectanea.
Instructors: Anna Marshall Shields
20th-Century Japanese Literature
Readings in selected texts in modern Japanese literature.
Instructors: Atsuko Ueda
Introduction to Kanbun
Introduction to the basics of reading Chinese-style Classical Japanese and its related forms. Texts: Literary and historical texts from both China and Japan.
Instructors: Keiko Ono
Manuscripts of Medieval China (400 - 1400)
This course introduces manuscripts of medieval China preserved in different forms from caves in Dunhuang and tombs in South China to calligraphic works and manuscripts found on the back sides of printed texts. It helps students to independently approach medieval manuscripts by introducing knowledge about the paper, formal and cursive writing, non-standard characters, and methods of punctuation on medieval manuscripts. It also introduces types of texts found only in manuscript forms, and offers ways of thinking about the culture of writing and reading in medieval China.
Instructors: Xin Wen
Readings in Japanese Academic Style II
The second half of the two-semester course, which trains students in reading the particular style of Japanese academic writing. The second semester particularly focuses on academic writings from Meiji to the 1950s, including brief introduction of necessary Classical Japanese Grammar for this purpose. Course conducted in English.
Instructors: Keiko Ono
Readings in Ancient and Medieval Japanese History
This course is designed to introduce fundamental themes and debates about ancient and medieval Japanese history, and how conceptualizations of Japan have changed over time from the third century CE through 1600. Approximately two books, or a comparable number of articles, are required each week, and wherever possible, a brief passage of Japanese scholarship will be presented as well. Reading knowledge of modern Japanese is desirable.
Instructors: Thomas Donald Conlan
Japanese Film and Media Studies: Dispossession, Documentary, and the Geopolitics of Image Media
This course examines the vivid perspectives of Japanese documentary media from 1945 to present as the focal point of our consideration of the geopolitics of image media. We will explore major documentary works that critically engage issues of cultural identity, environmental devastation, regional community, and historical memory to raise questions about the changing prospects and politics of image media. Our shifting focal points will capture key transformations in the archipelago's urban and media environments from the dynamic views of Japan's most influential writers, critics, and media practitioners.
Instructors: Franz K. Prichard
The Chinese Erotic Novel Jin Ping Mei
The primary aim of the course is to read a good part of the one hundred chapters of this work. To do so the course employs different editions, looks carefully at some of its illustrations, compares the novel with some of its source material, and investigates briefly a sampling of the novel's sequels and adaptations.
Instructors: Pieter Christiaan Aize Keulemans

Korean-language courses (Spring 2018)

Elementary Korean I
Elementary Korean is designed for beginning students who intend to build a solid foundation for further study in the Korean language. The course provides four balanced language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - needed for basic communication. It emphasizes the ability to use Korean appropriately and introduces students to useful information concerning culture and daily life in Korea.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, Yuseon Yun
Intensive Korean I
The first part of Intensive Korean is designed for heritage students who have already had considerable amount of exposure to the Korean language and culture but have not received any formal instruction before their arriving at Princeton. It covers the Elementary Korean material focusing on vocabulary building, grammar, reading and writing.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji
Intermediate Korean I
Intermediate Korean is designed for students who have learned the basics of the Korean language and want to improve their language skills. Complex sentences and grammar are covered while the basics are reviewed. Balancing four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- is emphasized.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji, Jae Rim Yoon
Advanced Korean I
Advanced Korean is designed to develop fluency in both oral and literary skills. Expansion of vocabulary, practice in reading comprehension as well as active skills of conversation and writing are stressed through short readings and class discussion. Readings include different styles of writings on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, Jae Rim Yoon
Integrative Korean I
This fourth-year Korean course is designed to promote students' proficiency to the advanced-mid level and to enhance their continued development of literacy skills in Korean. Various authentic reading materials are reviewed in class discussion, presentation skills are emphasized, and a wider range of formal vocabulary is introduced.
Instructors: Jae Rim Yoon
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture I
This fifth-year language course is designed to accelerate students' proficiency to the high-advanced level to promote a deeper level of understanding of contemporary Korea and its people. A wide range of social, cultural and economic issues are covered through the use of various media resources (e.g., dramas, films, songs, commercials, newspapers, websites) as well as short essays. Classroom discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Readings in Modern Korean l
This sixth-year Korean course is designed to advance students' reading and writing skills to the superior level and to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, culture, society, and history. Readings cover various types of authentic materials (e.g., newspaper articles, editorials, think pieces, essays, and contemporary literary short stories). Discussion and presentation skills in formal settings (e.g., academic, professional) are also emphasized. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi

EAS Courses (Fall 2017)

Urban Horror Cinema: Asian Cities Crisis
This course examines "urban horror" and "capitalism" as the cinematic motifs in contemporary East and Southeast Asian films. From Beijing to Hong Kong, and Singapore to Inner Mongolia, Asian cities are harboring urban imaginations that challenge existing human comprehension. Through emptied city centers, inexplicable psychosis, and the dizzying display of accelerated traffic, urban horror cinema provides a space for understanding the relationship between capitalist and (post-)socialist urban transformations-zoning, demolition, real estate speculation, housing crisis, street protest-and the mental life in the region's mega-metropolises.
Instructors: Erin Yu-Tien Huang
Writing and Culture of Premodern Korea
This course is an introductory survey of the cultural history of premodern Korea-from early times until the turn of the twentieth century-focused on the primary sources. We will read various original materials (in English translation): myths, state histories, diaries, travelogues, and works of fiction, among others. Topics covered in this course include the imagination of the origins in myth, the idea of Confucian governance, everyday life and entertainment in Choson (1392-1910), and Korea's opening to the west in the late nineteenth century.
Instructors: Ksenia Chizhova
The Arts of Japan
ART 217 surveys the arts of Japan from the pre-historic period through the present day. Painting, sculpture, and architecture form the core of study, though we will also examine the critical role of other forms, including calligraphy, lacquer, and ceramics. Throughout the course we will take close account of the broader cultural and historical contexts in which art was made. Our topics include the ongoing tension in Japanese art between the foreign and the indigenous, the role of ritual in Japan's visual arts, the re-uses of the past, the changing loci of patronage, and the formats and materials of Japanese art.
Instructors: Andrew Mark Watsky
Japanese Society and Culture
During the decades after World War II, Japan became the world's second largest economy and a highly productive, technologized society. While Americans once regarded Japan as a land of "corporate warriors," today Japan has become known for its popular culture, critiques of environmental destruction, and gentler variety of capitalism. We explore key social issues including gender, labor, affect, sports, media, poplular culture, biopolitics, law, demography and population control.
Instructors: Amy Beth Borovoy
East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations
An introduction to the literature, art, religion and philosophy of China, Japan and Korea from antiquity to ca. 1400. Readings focus on primary texts in translation, complemented by museum visits and supplementary materials on the course website. The course aims to allow students to explore the unique aspects of East Asian civilizations and the connections between them through an interactive web-based platform, in which assignments are integrated with the texts and media on the website. No prior knowledge of working with digital media is required.
Instructors: Anna Marshall Shields, Brian R. Steininger
Junior Seminar
This seminar teaches the research and writing skills needed to produce a thesis as an East Asian studies major. Through mini-projects and guest lectures, the class introduces the various disciplines and methodologies used to study East Asia, including history, anthropology, political science, history, literature, and media studies. In addition, the class teaches techniques of research and writing: how to formulate a research question, find and use appropriate sources, write a research proposal, craft a compelling introduction and convincing conclusion.
Instructors: Brian R. Steininger
Japanese Film & Media Studies
Study of contemporary Japan through major works of film, photography, and visual culture. The course will explore defining transformations in urban and media ecologies, experiences of development and disaster, and the contentious environmental histories that inform contemporary Japan. The course will foster critical skills in interdisciplinary methods and transnational approaches to the study of film and visual media from Japan in regional and global contexts.
Instructors: Franz K. Prichard
Empire to Nation: 20th Century Japanese Fiction and Film
This course will examine modern Japanese fiction and film that engaged with Japan's shift from "empire" to "nation" (roughly from 1930s to 1960s) with a specific focus on identity formation via race, ethnicity, and nationalism.
Instructors: Atsuko Ueda
Cinematic Translation, Generic Adaptation: Melodrama, Horror, Action
This course centers on a set on cinematic genres-melodrama, horror, and action-that have proven to be particularly suitable to global adaptation and appropriation. Their mobility may stem from the physical responses (tears, fright, violence) they represent or elicit. We will examine films from Hollywood, European, and East Asian cinemas to interrogate the question of cultural translatability, while at the same time reconsidering the social and cultural effects of genre itself. One of the central questions of our investigations will be: How do cinematic forms and their translation inform the discourses of nation and cultural difference?
Instructors: Steven Chung
Landscape and the Visual Arts in China (Tenth Century to the Twentieth Century)
This course focuses on the genre of landscape in Chinese painting, prints, and photography from the tenth century to modern times. Landscape was the most revered genre of painting in pre-modern China; it has shaped most of the discourses on art in later Chinese history and still features prominently in contemporary artistic creation and theory. This course examines the issues associated with landscape art, including the tradition and global relevance of ink landscape painting, the relationship of painting with prints and photography, travel and mapping as landscape themes, and the associations among landscape, place, and territory.
Instructors: Cheng-hua Wang
Chinese Politics
This course provides an overview of China's political system. We will begin with a brief historical overview of China's political development from 1949 to the present. The remainder of the course will examine the key challenges facing the current generation of CCP leadership, focusing on prospects for democratization and political reform. Among other topics, we will examine: factionalism and political purges; corruption; avenues for political participation; village elections; public opinion; protest movements and dissidents; co-optation of the business class; and media and internet control.
Instructors: Rory Truex
Contemporary Korean Media Cultures
Whether we look at its speed, connectivity and convergence, the geographic reach of its exports, or the contradictions that characterize its relationship to social reality, contemporary Korean media poses provocative questions about conditions of life in Korea and the mechanisms of communications and cultural technologies globally. Through examination of a range of practices across the mediascape (TV dramas, music, webtoons, films, advertisements, etc.) and phenomenon that have arisen from them (the Korean Wave, the rise of national sports heroes, etc.) the class will consider the force of contemporary media in shaping the very idea of Korea.
Instructors: Steven Chung
Readings in Modern Japanese I
This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. In this class students will (1) discuss various issues in international relations focusing on Asian nations, using dramas, short novels and editorials, and (2) learn Japanese business manners and speak and write business Japanese. Through these activities, students will develop critical thinking skills as well as Japanese language skills.
Instructors: Yukari Tokumasu
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture I
The fifth-year language course is designed to accelerate students' proficiency to the high-advanced level and 5th-level to promote a deeper level of understanding of contemporary Korea and its people. A wide range of social, cultural and economic issues are covered through the use of various media resources (e.g., dramas, films, songs, commercials, newspapers, websites) as well as short essays. Classroom discussion are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Readings in Modern Chinese Intellectual History
Designed to give students who have had advanced training in modern Chinese an opportunity for directed readings in their own fields. The focus of readings is modern Chinese intellectual history.
Song Dynasty Painting
The Song Dynasty has long been considered the high point of Chinese painting, representing a classical period to which later artists consistently looked back.This seminar will explore the artistic qualities and development of landscape, figure, and flower-and-bird painting and will consider main issues concerning these genres. Such issues include the relative importance of different genres, the relationship between the natural and the human world, the roles of the court and literati in producing art, and the materiality and visuality of Song painting.
Instructors: Cheng-hua Wang
China's Frontiers
This seminar will examine how the territorial footprint of the People's Republic of China was created, by exploring the history of its frontier regions. Through units on Tibet, Xinjiang, Taiwan, Manchuria, and the Southwest, we will interrogate concepts of ethnic identity, nationalism, culture, and religion, as well as contested historical claims over territory and sovereignty. Some basic knowledge of modern Chinese history is helpful but not required.
Instructors: Janet Y. Chen
Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities: How the Past Became History - East Asia and the Ancient Mediterranean
This course explores the emergence of history as a field of knowledge in the ancient Mediterranean and in East Asia. It will guide students to investigate the cultural presuppositions for historiography, comparing two cultures that created their own indigenous tradition, China and Greece, and two that borrowed and adapted foreign traditions, Japan and Rome. We will discuss the specific nature of historiography, comparing it with other ways of transmitting and/or constructing memories of past events, and reflect on the respective historical and cultural implications of these different ways of dealing with the past.
Instructors: Nino Luraghi, Federico Marcon
Chinese Intellectual History
Methods, sources, and problems of research in history of Chinese thought.
Instructors: Willard James Peterson
Readings in Early Modern Japanese History
A survey of major issues in the historiography of early modern Japan and Meiji Japan (1600-1890).
Instructors: Federico Marcon
Readings in Ancient Japanese History
This course is devoted to understanding the varied and unique sources of Ancient Japan, focusing on the seventh through eleventh centuries. Instruction is focused on reading and translating a variety of documentary genres, and court chronicles. Each week entails the translation of several short documents. Some research resources and methods are also introduced. In addition to weekly assignments, a presentation of the final research paper is required during the final class and a 12-15 page research paper is due on Dean's Day.
Instructors: Thomas Donald Conlan
Chinese Literature: The Verses of Chu (Chuci)
Through close readings of original sources, we analyze the anthology of the Verses of Chu (Chuci) in its poetic, historical, and hermeneutic dimensions. Drawing on a wider range of early historical, literary, and philosophical texts, we contextualize the songs in late Warring States and early Han literary and intellectual culture. In addition, we trace the anthology's poetic reception in medieval times as well as its history of scholarship from the Han Dynasty to the present.
Instructors: Martin Kern
Readings in Chinese Literature: Prose and Poetry of the Northern Song
This course surveys Northern Song poetry and prose, focusing on new styles and genres appearing in the 11th century. Genres include: regulated verse; song lyrics; remarks on poetry (shihua); essays; travel writing; funerary texts. Authors include Ouyang Xiu, Mei Yaochen, Su Shi, Huang Tingjian, Yan Shu, Liu Yong, Wang Anshi, Sima Guang. Secondary scholarship in Chinese, Japanese, and English will focus on genres and writers. We consider Song literature in the framework of Chinese literary history, the discursive nature of Song poetry, aesthetics of song lyrics, and new prose styles.
Instructors: Anna Marshall Shields
Modern Japanese Prose
A study of selected major authors and literary trends in modern Japan, with an emphasis on the Meiji and Taisho periods.
Instructors: Atsuko Ueda
Readings in Kanbun
This course focuses on various types of Japanese kanbun, including waka kanbun (Japanese vernacular kanbun) from Nara to Meiji era. Basic knowledge of classical Japanese grammar and kanbun kundoku reading is required.
Instructors: Keiko Ono
Japan Anthropology in Historical Perspective
The course concerns Japan studies in the context of theories of capitalism, personhood, democracy, gender, and modernity. We discuss issues of fieldwork as method and "area" as a unit of analysis. We also consider the pace of Japan in American social thought. One thematic focus is on medicine and biotechnology and their engagement with social and historical processes.
Instructors: Amy Beth Borovoy
Readings in Japanese Academic Style
The two-semester course is designed for students in Chinese studies, who already possess reading fluency in Chinese. Its goal is to train these students in reading the particular style of Japanese academic writing; at the end of the year, students will be able to independently read modern Japanese scholarship on China. Students take this course after at least one year of modern Japanese (JPN 101/102). The course does not train all four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening; instead it is devoted entirely to rapidly develop the necessary reading skills in Japanese academic style. The course is conducted in English.
Instructors: Keiko Ono
Presentiments: Towards Modern Korean Literature
This course problematizes the ideas of "modern" and "literature" which were no more than hypotheses in turn-of-the-20th-century Korea. We trace the aesthetic and intellectual transformations in lineage novels, hybrid novels that test the boundaries of traditional form, sinsosol, essays, and early textbooks of Korean literature. As a result, rather than viewing the emergence of modern literature in Korea as a self-certain trajectory within the teleological timeline of the nation-state, we note the zones of ambiguity, hybridity, and dialog around it.
Instructors: Ksenia Chizhova
Seeing the Interior: Cinema, Media, Inverse Visuality
From the invention of microscope, X-rays, to psychoanalysis and cinema, the world is increasingly mediated and constituted by visual technologies and new forms of visualities that collapse the boundaries between visibility and invisibility. This seminar explores visual representations of the "interior" and their mediating roles in the historical and social processes of colonialism, infrastructural revolution, (post-)socialism, and global capitalism in the East Asian and global context. Readings intersect cinema and media studies, globalization and urban studies, science studies, and Marxist feminism.
Instructors: Erin Yu-Tien Huang

Chinese-language Courses (Fall 2017)

Elementary Chinese I
An intensive introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese, stressing oral-aural facility and the analysis of structure.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou, Xin Zou
Intensive Elementary Chinese
Designed for students who already have some familiarity with spoken Mandarin. The course will emphasize reading and writing skills. Students who speak Mandarin with non-standard accents will be trained in standard pronunciation.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou, Xin Zou
Intermediate Chinese I
While reinforcing the knowledge students have acquired thus far, this course will further develop the students' audio-lingual proficiency as well as bring their reading and writing ability to a higher level.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou, Xin Zou
Introduction to Classical Chinese I
CHI 301 not only provides basic training for students in classical Chinese, but also introduces students to theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as the concept of Dao, life and death, etc. Each theme is consisted of passages selected from Chinese classics and short essays or stories full of wisdom and wit from later dynasties. This course will not only improve your four skills in Chinese language but also enhance your understanding of traditional Chinese philosophy and culture in general.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou, Xin Zou
Third-Year Modern Chinese I
Designed to further develop the student's overall language skills through reading and discussion of contemporary affairs published in Chinese newspapers.
Instructors: Luanfeng Huang, Jing Xie
Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese I
Designed to further develop student's overall language skills through readings and discussion of contemporary affairs published in Chinese newspapers.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou, Xin Zou
Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I
Reading and discussion of selections from Chinese and newspapers on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou, Xin Zou
Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I
Reading and discussion based on Chinese scholarly journals, popular essays, and newspaper articles. Students are exposed to a variety of modern Chinese literary genres, as well as some of the major substantive issues that modern Chinese intellectuals have faced.
Instructors: Chih-p'ing Chou, Xin Zou

Japanese-language Courses (Fall 2017)

Elementary Japanese I
An intensive introduction to modern Japanese stressing oral-aural facility, but including an introduction to written Japanese.
Instructors: Shinji Sato, Tomoko Shibata, Yukari Tokumasu
Intermediate Japanese I
This course aims to give a thorough mastery of modern colloquial Japanese (Tokyo speech) by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points and more advanced vocabulary and grammar. Students will reinforce four major skills by speaking - listening drills, readings, and written exercises.
Instructors: Hisae Matsui, Christopher Jeffre Schad
Advanced Japanese I
This course is designed to further students' reading ability. Students will have ample opportunity to hear and use increasingly more sophisticated vocabulary and grammatical constructions through discussion and composition. Japanese video will also be incorporated into the course. Reading materials include "Tobira" and selected readings from works in the original language.
Instructors: Hisae Matsui, Christopher Jeffre Schad
Integrative Advanced Japanese I
Four skills approach to advanced Japanese with a focus on reading, listening and speaking. Reading materials include novels, essays, etc. Video materials are also used to enhance listening skills. The goal of this course is "advanced" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors: Tomoko Shibata
Readings in Modern Japanese I
This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. In this class students will (1) discuss various issues in international relations focusing on Asian nations, using dramas, short novels and editorials, and (2) learn Japanese business manners and speak and write business Japanese. Through these activities, students will develop critical thinking skills as well as Japanese language skills.
Instructors: Yukari Tokumasu
Contemporary Japanese Language and Culture I
This course emphasizes continued development of four skills used in academic or professional settings. Materials include novels, essays, reports, films, and documentaries. The goal of this course is "superior" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors: Shinji Sato, Yukari Tokumasu

Korean-language Courses (Fall 2017)

Elementary Korean I
Elementary Korean is designed for beginning students who intend to build a solid foundation for further study in the Korean language. The course provides four balanced language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - needed for basic communication. It emphasizes the ability to use Korean appropriately and introduces students to useful information concerning culture and daily life in Korea.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji, Joowon Suh, Yuseon Yun
Intensive Korean I
The first part of Intensive Korean is designed for heritage students who have already had considerable amount of exposure to the Korean language and culture but have not received any formal instruction before their arriving at Princeton. It covers the Elementary Korean material focusing on vocabulary building, grammar, reading and writing.
Instructors: Eunjung Ji
Intermediate Korean I
Intermediate Korean is designed for students who have learned the basics of the Korean language and want to improve their competence to a higher level. Complex sentences and grammar are covered while the basics are reviewed. Balancing four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- is emphasized.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi
Advanced Korean I
Advanced Korean is designed to develop fluency in both oral and literary skills. Expansion of vocabulary, practice in reading comprehension as well as active skills of conversation and writing are stressed through short readings and class discussion. Readings include different styles of writings on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi
Integrative Korean I
The fourth-year Korean is designed to promote students' proficiency to the advanced-mid level and to enhance their continued development of literacy skills in Korean. Various authentic reading materials are reviewed in class discussion, presentation skills are emphasized, and a wider range of formal vocabulary is introduced.
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture I
The fifth-year language course is designed to accelerate students' proficiency to the high-advanced level and 5th-level to promote a deeper level of understanding of contemporary Korea and its people. A wide range of social, cultural and economic issues are covered through the use of various media resources (e.g., dramas, films, songs, commercials, newspapers, websites) as well as short essays. Classroom discussion are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun