Courses

East Asian Content Courses (Fall 2022)

20th-Century Japan (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 322 / EAS 324

Covering 1868 to the present, this course emphasizes Japan's dramatic rise as the modern world's first non-Western power, imperialism, industrialization, social change, gender relations, democracy, World War II, the U. S. Occupation, the postwar "economic miracle" followed by slow growth, and the preoccupation with national identity in a Western-dominated world. We will think about post-1945 developments in terms of continuities with prewar Japan. We will also hold Japan up as a "mirror" for America, comparing how the two capitalist societies have dealt with inequality, urbanization, health and welfare, and intervention in the economy.

Instructors
Sheldon M. Garon
20th-Century Japanese History
Subject associations
HIS 527 / EAS 522

Readings in Japanese political, social, and economic history. Topics include transwar continuity and change, political economy, labor, gender issues, culture and state, religion, Japanese expansion and colonialism, the Allied Occupation of Japan and "social management," and transnational-historical approaches to studying Japan. Some readings in Japanese (optional for those who do not specialize in Japanese history).

Instructors
Sheldon M. Garon
Chinese Politics (SA)
Subject associations
POL 362 / SPI 323 / EAS 362

This course provides an overview of China's political system. We will begin with a brief historical overview of China's political development from 1949 to the present. The remainder of the course will examine the key challenges facing the current generation of CCP leadership, focusing on prospects for democratization and political reform. Among other topics, we will examine: factionalism and political purges; corruption; avenues for political participation; village elections; public opinion; protest movements and dissidents; co-optation of the business class; and media and internet control.

Instructors
Rory Truex
Cosmopolitan Her: Writing in Late Capitalism (CD or LA)
Subject associations
EAS 332 / GSS 429 / COM 329

This course introduces students to twenty-first-century Asian women writers (Japan, Korea, China) whose works achieved global popularity through translation in the past two decades. Written by writers living in East Asian countries dealing with capitalist developments, financial crises, and neoliberal free trade agreements, the texts collectively suggest the global interest and transmission of women's rights and LGBTQ movements in Asia and beyond. We explore, firstly, the meaning of "capitalism" as seen by the author in each text, and secondly, a commodified urban-based cosmopolitan culture that depends on the continued orientalism of Asia.

Instructors
Erin Y. Huang
Early Modern China (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 324 / EAS 354

This course surveys the history of China between 1400 and 1800, tracing the foundation and decline of the Ming dynasty, the consolidation of Manchu rule till the end of the High Qing era. The main aims are 1) to understand the tremendous changes in Chinese society during this period 2) to see the continued relevance of China's recent imperial past in its contemporary existence. Topics discussed include governance, morality, family life, religion, and ethnicity.

Instructors
He Bian
East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations (EM)
Subject associations
HUM 233 / EAS 233 / COM 233

An introduction to the literature, art, religion and philosophy of China, Japan and Korea from antiquity to ca. 1600. Readings focus on primary texts in translation and are complemented by museum visits and supplementary materials on the course website. The course aims to allow students to explore the unique aspects of East Asian civilizations and the connections between them through an interactive web-based platform, in which assignments are integrated with the texts and media on the website. No prior knowledge of East Asia or experience working with digital media is required.

Instructors
Paize Keulemans
Brian R. Steininger
Empire to Nation: 20th Century Japanese Fiction and Film (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 310

This course will examine modern Japanese fiction and film that engaged with Japan's shift from "empire" to "nation" (roughly from 1930s to 1960s) with a specific focus on identity formation via race, ethnicity, and nationalism.

Instructors
Atsuko Ueda
Intellectual History of China to the Fifth Century (EM)
Subject associations
EAS 415 / HIS 444

Critical consideration of a selection of monumental contributions to early Chinese thought, and the uses to which they were put by later Chinese thinkers. Readings will be from English translations such as: [Analects],[ Lao-tzu], [Chuang-tzu], [Mencius],[ I-ching] and secondary works.

Intermediate Vietnamese I
Subject associations
EAS 105

Intermediate Vietnamese I will expand your structures and knowledge of the Vietnamese language and multifaceted culture through idioms, proverbs, dialogues, and stories. Classroom activities and practices will help you communicate effectively and absorb meaning through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Japan Anthropology in Historical Perspective
Subject associations
EAS 549 / ANT 549

The course concerns Japan studies in the context of theories of capitalism, personhood, democracy, gender, and modernity. We consider the emergence of Japan as a place to think within the American social sciences after World War II and the development of ideas about area studies in the context of the Cold War and post Cold War conjunctures. Additionally the course considers topics in which Japan is relevant to thinking about global issues, including global capitalism, temporary labor, biopolitics, environmental consciousness, media culture and consumer culture, work-life balance, and the demographic crisis related to rapid aging.

Instructors
Amy B. Borovoy
Japan's Media Mix: Anime/Cinema/Gaming (SA)
Subject associations
EAS 260

This course surveys Japan's vibrant media mix cultures spanning the histories of anime, cinema and gaming through the intersections of film and media studies. Charting the emergence of media mix cultures and "new" media technologies from silent film to augmented reality in Japan, this course introduces students to major works of anime (animated feature films, television series, and other formats), cinema, and video games. We will examine the changing contours of work and play, sentiment and sensation, thought and materiality, and the forms of mediation and social relation that defined Japan's modern media mix ecologies and platforms.

Instructors
Franz K. Prichard
Japanese Film & Media Studies (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 303

Study of contemporary Japan through major works of film, photography, and visual culture. The course will explore defining transformations in urban and media ecologies, experiences of development and disaster, and the contentious environmental histories that inform contemporary Japan. The course will foster critical skills in interdisciplinary methods and transnational approaches to the study of film and visual media from Japan in regional and global contexts.

Instructors
Franz K. Prichard
Japanese Society and Culture (SA)
Subject associations
EAS 225 / ANT 323

Japan became the first non-Western nation to industrialize and modernize in the late 19th century, determined to fend off colonization. Decades later, Japan challenged Americans to imagine alternative futures through its economic success and later its "soft power." The course will consider change and continuity in Japan and how Japan's current status as a stable, slowly growing economy informs our views of capitalism and society in the current era. Topics include gender, labor, and corporate welfare; youth socialization; marriage and divorce; race, "Japaneseness" and citizenship; diasporic identities; sub-cultures and popular culture.

Instructors
Amy B. Borovoy
Junior Seminar
Subject associations
EAS 300

This seminar teaches the research and writing skills needed to produce a thesis as an East Asian studies major. Through mini-projects and guest lectures, the class introduces the various disciplines and methodologies used to study East Asia, including history, anthropology, political science, history, literature, and media studies. In addition, the class teaches techniques of research and writing: how to formulate a research question, find and use appropriate sources, write a research proposal, craft a compelling introduction and convincing conclusion.

Instructors
Xin Wen
Korea Post Present
Subject associations
EAS 557

Contemporary Korea may be defined by multiple and overlapping "post" conditions: post-colonial, post-Cold War, post-socialist, post-IMF, post-political, post-human, etc. Drawing upon seminal scholarly works in the fields of literature, history, sociology, media studies, art history and gender and sexuality studies published over the past two decades, this seminar tracks the research methods and theoretical architectures through which the present has come to be conceptualized. While seminar discussion is conducted entirely in English, high-level Korean reading proficiency is required.

Instructors
Steven Chung
Militarized Aesthetics: War, Image, Asia
Subject associations
COM 556 / EAS 556

What is media's role in shaping the materiality and definition of modern warfare? From image-making machines, drones to algorithms, and satellite mapping to artificial intelligence, war is the inventor of new visual and sensory regimes that give shape to the post/human environments we inhabit. This seminar considers classic French and German media theory on war in a new light, by focusing on Asia (Vietnams, Koreas, Chinas) as the primary site of sensory warfare, and the new inventor of experimental technologies of control. We probe the history of militarized aesthetics and unpack the operations of war machines.

Instructors
Erin Y. Huang
Modern China
Subject associations
HIS 530 / EAS 520

This seminar introduces students to major historiographical issues and methodological issues in China's twentieth-century history. The content is divided evenly between the Republic period and PRC history, with occasional forays back to the Qing dynasty. Topics reflect theoretical debates and empirical questions, including: nationalism, civil society, urban life, gender and sexuality, war and revolution, science, law.

Instructors
Janet Y. Chen
Modern Japanese Prose
Subject associations
EAS 542

A study of selected major authors and literary trends in modern Japan, with an emphasis on the Meiji and Taisho periods.

Instructors
Atsuko Ueda
Narrative and Visuality in China (LA)
Subject associations
ART 493 / EAS 493

This class explores the relationship between visual and verbal media. How is poetic vision not only given shape in words, but also in painting? Conversely, how is the beauty of women, a staple of portraiture, captured in words? How can a still picture express narrative in a medium that develops over time, and conversely how can words capture the spectacle of a martial arts action scene? We will answer these questions by investigating some of the most famous novels, paintings, poems, and prints, beginning with didactic paintings preaching Confucian values and ending with the birth of modern media such as animation and computer graphics.

Instructors
Paize Keulemans
Cheng-hua Wang
Nomadic Empires: From the Scythian Confederation to the Mongol Conquest (HA)
Subject associations
EAS 280 / HIS 279

In telling histories of East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and Europe, various groups of nomadic people often loomed large in the background and served as the foil to the travail of their sedentary neighbors. In this course we put the nomadic peoples of Inner Asia front and center, and ask how the nomadic way of life and mode of state building served as agents of change in pre-modern Eurasia.

Instructors
Xin Wen
Primary Sources in Japanese Literature: Material Culture of Pre-Industrial Books
Subject associations
EAS 540

This course introduces students to the location, handling, and interpretation of primary sources in the study of premodern Japanese literature and intellectual history. This semester functions as a crash course in the the analysis of books and other textual artifacts from premodern Japan. We practice asking, what is it? How does it fit into the history of textual culture? Topics covered include bindings, glosses, colophons, fragments, paleography, cataloging, and xylography, making use of materials from Princeton's East Asian Library Rare Books Collection.

Instructors
Brian R. Steininger
Readings in Chinese Literature: Literary Theory in Tang and Song
Subject associations
EAS 533

This course focuses on theories of literature, literary production, and reading from the early Tang through the Southern Song. Primary sources include prefaces to literary collections, letters and essays on literature, debates over wen and the Classics, and poetry on writing and reading. Key writers l include Du Fu, Han Yu, Liu Zongyuan, Ouyang Xiu, Su Shi, the Cheng brothers, Zhu Xi, Lu You, and Liu Kezhuang. We consider changes in underlying definitions of literature amid significant social, political, and aesthetic shifts from Tang to Song. Secondary scholarship includes works in Chinese, Japanese, and English.

Instructors
Anna M. Shields
Readings in Japanese Academic Style
Subject associations
EAS 563

The two-semester course is designed for students in Chinese studies, who already possess reading fluency in Chinese. Its goal is to train these students in reading the particular style of Japanese academic writing; at the end of the year, students are able to independently read modern Japanese scholarship on China. Students take this course after at least one year of modern Japanese (JPN 101/102). The course does not train all four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening; instead it is devoted entirely to rapidly develop the necessary reading skills in Japanese academic style. The course is conducted in English.

Instructors
Keiko Ono
Readings in Japanese Religions: Buddhist Exchange between the Continent and Japan
Subject associations
REL 533 / EAS 535

This seminar explores exchange between Japanese and continental (China and Korean) Buddhism. We read primary sources and secondary scholarship including transmission narratives, hagiographies, and pilgrimage records to show how Buddhism in East Asia was facilitated by exchange and to move beyond nation-centered narratives. Significant time is spent on translation, as well as research methods and tools necessary for the study of premodern Japanese Buddhism. Readings require basic familiarity with classical Chinese or kanbun.

Instructors
Bryan D. Lowe
Readings in Kanbun
Subject associations
EAS 545

This course focuses on various types of Japanese kanbun, including waka kanbun (Japanese vernacular kanbun) from Nara to Meiji era.

Instructors
Keiko Ono
Readings in Modern Chinese Intellectual History (LA)
Subject associations
CHI 411 / EAS 411

This course is designed for students who have had advanced training in modern Chinese. The focus of readings is modern Chinese intellectual history. Topics that will be discussed include language reform, women's emancipation, the encounter of western civilization, the rise of communism, etc.

Instructors
Xin Zou
Readings in Modern Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 401 / EAS 401

This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. Students will (1) discuss various issues using dramas, short novels and editorials, and (2) learn business Japanese. Through these activities, students will develop critical thinking skills as well as Japanese language skills.

Instructors
Yukari Tokumasu
Readings in Modern Korean l (LA)
Subject associations
KOR 405 / EAS 405

This sixth-year Korean course is designed to advance students' reading and writing skills to the superior level and to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, culture, society, and history. Readings cover various types of authentic materials (e.g., newspaper articles, editorials, think pieces, essays, and contemporary literary short stories). Discussion and presentation skills in formal settings (e.g., academic, professional) are also emphasized. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.

Instructors
Ho Jung Choi
Script Theories: Korea, East Asia, and Beyond
Subject associations
EAS 580 / COM 580

This seminar considers the issues of language, writing, and inscription in a broad comparative perspective that brings together critical theory and recent scholarship on Korea and East Asia. It traces the issues of language and inscription against the frameworks of semiology (Derrida, Irigaray), discursive order (Foucault, Kittler), folds of matter and power (Deleuze), and ideological control (Althusser). The class also uses this theoretical framework to build our understanding of Korean (and, when applicable, East Asian) writing systems, from calligraphy, to the development of print and digital culture. All readings available in English.

Instructors
Ksenia Chizhova
The Arts and Archaeology of the Chinese Court (LA)
Subject associations
ART 369 / EAS 386

In China, denizens of the imperial court--emperors and entertainers, mighty and low-class, and the ministers who administered the realm in the middle--populated the court praxis of the arts. This course studies the courtly arts, from the rule of the first emperor Qin Shi Huang to the Empress Dowager Cixi in the early 20th century. It will show how these artworks were made and used in changing historical contexts and became an important legacy of Chinese culture. It particularly emphasizes the archaeology of early imperial tombs.

Instructors
Chao-Hui Jenny Liu
Cheng-hua Wang
The Passionate Eye: Documentary Film in East Asia (LA)
Subject associations
EAS 301

The seminar will encourage students to think critically about the documentary as artistic medium and as socio-political practice. Some important questions will focus on the form itself: who has produced and watched these films and through what sorts of technologies? What are the codes through which documentaries make sense of their subjects and how do these change? Other questions will have wider scope: how can filmmaking impact politics and culture? How does it deal with the gap between reality and representation? What are the ethical issues of such work? What, if anything, is distinct about the life of documentary films in East Asia?

Instructors
Steven Chung
Writing and Culture of Premodern Korea (HA)
Subject associations
EAS 216

This course is an introductory survey of the cultural history of premodern Korea-from early times until the turn of the twentieth century-focused on the primary sources. We will read various original materials (in English translation): myths, state histories, diaries, travelogues, and works of fiction, among others. Topics covered in this course include the imagination of the origins in myth, the idea of Confucian governance, everyday life and entertainment in Choson (1392-1910), and Korea's opening to the west in the late nineteenth century.

Instructors
Ksenia Chizhova
Zen Buddhism (CD or EM)
Subject associations
REL 280 / EAS 281

Most people have heard of Zen Buddhism, but what is it? Who gets to define it? This class looks at Zen in China, Korea, Germany, Japan, Vietnam, and the United States through a range of methods from reading classic texts to studying ethnographic accounts. By considering Zen in different times and places, we explore how a religion is shaped by its political and cultural environs. We examine tensions between romanticized ideals and practices on the ground and grapple with how to study complicated and sometimes troubling traditions. Topics include myths, meditation, mindfulness, monastic life, gender, war, and death.

Instructors
Bryan D. Lowe

Chinese-Language Courses (Fall 2022)

Elementary Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 101

An introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese, emphasizing oral-aural facility and the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Instructors
Jing Wang
Fang Yan
Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 403

This course consists of reading and discussion of selections from Chinese media on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.

Instructors
Jieyun Zhu
Intensive Elementary Chinese
Subject associations
CHI 103

Chinese 103 is designed for students who already have some familiarity with spoken Mandarin or any Chinese dialect. This course will emphasize the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Instructors
Yinqiu Ma
Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 405

This course consists of reading and discussion based on newspaper articles and essays by famous Chinese intellectuals on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Students will also be exposed to literary writings.

Instructors
Xinyue Huang
Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 305

Chinese 305 will further develop student's overall language skills through readings and discussion of contemporary issues published in Chinese media. This course is designed for students who have familiarity with spoken Mandarin or any Chinese dialect.

Instructors
Fang-Yen Hsieh
Intermediate Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 105

While reinforcing the knowledge students have acquired thus far, this course will further develop the students' audio-lingual proficiency and bring their reading and writing ability to a higher level.

Instructors
Fang-Yen Hsieh
Luanfeng Huang
Xinyue Huang
Fang Yan
Yu Zhang
Jieyun Zhu
Introduction to Classical Chinese I (HA)
Subject associations
CHI 301

Chinese 301 provides basic training for students in classical Chinese and introduces students to theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as the concept of Dao, life and death, Confucian ethics, etc. Each theme consists of passages selected from Chinese classics and short essays or stories full of wisdom and wit from later dynasties. This course will not only improve your four skills in Chinese language (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) but also enhances your general understanding of traditional Chinese philosophy and culture.

Instructors
Jue Lu
Jing Wang
Introductory Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 1002

Introductory Chinese (CHI 1002) is a continuation of CHI 1001, an introductory course for true beginners. It is taught at half the instructional pace of First Year Chinese (CHI 101). The goal of this course is to develop students' four basic communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, using both the Pinyin Romanization phonetic system and simplified (modern) Chinese characters. By the end of this course, students will be able to handle simple "survival situations" in Chinese, read and write over 300 Chinese characters, and engage in more advanced and intensive study of Chinese in the future.

Instructors
Ying Ou
Readings in Modern Chinese Intellectual History (LA)
Subject associations
CHI 411 / EAS 411

This course is designed for students who have had advanced training in modern Chinese. The focus of readings is modern Chinese intellectual history. Topics that will be discussed include language reform, women's emancipation, the encounter of western civilization, the rise of communism, etc.

Instructors
Xin Zou
Third-Year Modern Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 303

This course is designed to further develop students' overall language skills through reading and discussion of contemporary issues published in Chinese media.

Instructors
Jing Wang

Japanese-Language Courses (Fall 2022)

Advanced Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 301

This course is designed to further students' reading ability. Students will have ample opportunity to hear and use increasingly more sophisticated vocabulary and grammatical constructions through discussion and composition. Japanese video will also be incorporated into the course. Reading materials include "Tobira" and selected readings from works in the original language.

Instructors
Yukari Tokumasu
Megumi Watanabe
Contemporary Japanese Language and Culture I
Subject associations
JPN 407

This course emphasizes continued development of the four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) used in academic or professional settings. Materials include novels, essays, reports, films, and documentaries. The goal of this course is "superior" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.

Instructors
Shinji Sato
Tomoko Shibata
Elementary Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 101

An intensive introduction to modern Japanese stressing oral-aural facility, but including an introduction to written Japanese.

Instructors
Hisae Matsui
Shinji Sato
Tomoko Shibata
Yukari Tokumasu
Integrative Advanced Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 305

This course focuses on speaking, reading, listening, and writing with the goal of preparing students to continue on to JPN 306 in the Spring. Reading materials include novels, essays, etc. Video materials are also used to enhance listening skills. The goal of this course is "advanced" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.

Instructors
Tomoko Shibata
Intermediate Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 105

This course aims to give a thorough mastery of modern colloquial Japanese (Tokyo speech) by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points and more advanced vocabulary and grammar. Students will reinforce four major skills by using speaking - listening drills, readings, and written exercises.

Instructors
Hisae Matsui
Megumi Watanabe
Introduction to Classical Japanese
Subject associations
JPN 403

Introduction to the fundamentals of classical Japanese grammar. This course trains students to read premodern Japanese historical and literary texts. Texts: Makura no Soshi, Taketori Monogatari, Ujishui Monogatari, Hyakunin Isshu, etc.

Instructors
Keiko Ono
Readings in Modern Japanese I
Subject associations
JPN 401 / EAS 401

This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. Students will (1) discuss various issues using dramas, short novels and editorials, and (2) learn business Japanese. Through these activities, students will develop critical thinking skills as well as Japanese language skills.

Instructors
Yukari Tokumasu

Korean-Language Courses (Fall 2022)

Advanced Korean I
Subject associations
KOR 301

Advanced Korean is designed to develop fluency in both oral and literary skills. Expansion of vocabulary, practice in reading comprehension as well as active skills of conversation and writing are stressed through short readings and class discussion. Readings include different styles of writings on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history.

Instructors
Susie Kim
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture I
Subject associations
KOR 401

This fifth-year language course is designed to accelerate students' proficiency to the high-advanced level to promote a deeper level of understanding of contemporary Korea and its people. A wide range of social, cultural and economic issues are covered through the use of various media resources (e.g., dramas, films, songs, commercials, newspapers, websites) as well as short essays. Classroom discussions are conducted in Korean.

Instructors
Yuseon Yun
Elementary Korean I
Subject associations
KOR 101

Elementary Korean is designed for beginning students who intend to build a solid foundation for further study in the Korean language. The course provides four balanced language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - needed for basic communication. It emphasizes the ability to use Korean appropriately and introduces students to useful information concerning culture and daily life in Korea.

Instructors
Ho Jung Choi
Namseok Yong
Integrative Korean I
Subject associations
KOR 303

This fourth-year Korean course is designed to promote students' proficiency to the advanced-mid level and to enhance their continued development of literacy skills in Korean. Various authentic reading and audiovisual materials are reviewed in class discussion, presentation skills are emphasized, and a wider range of formal vocabulary is introduced.

Instructors
Namseok Yong
Intensive Korean I
Subject associations
KOR 103

The first part of Intensive Korean is designed for heritage students who have already had considerable amount of exposure to the Korean language and culture but have not received any formal instruction before their arriving at Princeton. It covers the Elementary Korean material focusing on vocabulary building, grammar, reading and writing.

Instructors
Yuseon Yun
Intermediate Korean I
Subject associations
KOR 105

Intermediate Korean is designed for students who have learned the basics of the Korean language and want to improve their language skills. Complex sentences and grammar are covered while the basics are reviewed. Balancing four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- is emphasized. Journals are kept to practice better self-expression in Korean. Cultural aspects of language learning are reinforced through readings, media, and virtual reality contents.

Instructors
Susie Kim
Readings in Modern Korean l (LA)
Subject associations
KOR 405 / EAS 405

This sixth-year Korean course is designed to advance students' reading and writing skills to the superior level and to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, culture, society, and history. Readings cover various types of authentic materials (e.g., newspaper articles, editorials, think pieces, essays, and contemporary literary short stories). Discussion and presentation skills in formal settings (e.g., academic, professional) are also emphasized. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.

Instructors
Ho Jung Choi

EAS Courses (Spring 2022)

Spring 2022
Intermediate Vietnamese II
Subject associations
EAS 107
This course will expand your structures and knowledge of the Vietnamese language and multifaceted culture through idioms, proverbs, dialogues, and stories. Classroom activities and practices will help you communicate effectively and absorb meaning through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.
Instructors
Anna Shields
Spring 2022
The Three Kingdoms Across Media: Characters in History, Fiction, and Video Games
Subject associations
EAS 223
How does a historical general become a god? How does an exemplary emperor turn into an evil villain? Is a warrior in a novel the same as a figure made of pixels in a video game? This course investigates the central element to animate the famous Chinese tale Romance of the Three Kingdoms: its heroes. We explore these characters in terms of political ideology, gender norms, and religious needs. We compare how a character's physical attributes, personality, and life stories change across media, from storyteller tale, to novel, to video game. By doing so we ask how notions of individuality and identity change across times and cultures.
Instructors
Paize Keulemans
Spring 2022
Fashion and East Asia
Subject associations
EAS 241 / COM 250 / GSS 242
This class expands the conceptual boundaries of fashion beyond designer labels and celebrity trends toward an address of the socio-technological function of fashion in East Asia. The central aim of the course is to engage thinking about fashion as a multilayered site where East Asia's media infrastructure, gender politics, labor systems, and non-human entities intersect. Scrutinizing the role of the state as well as the industry's racialized grammars, we will examine how fashion articulates with presumed binaries of class, ideology, gender, age and race in understanding East Asian national and diasporic formations.
Instructors
Chan Yong Bu
Steven Chung
Spring 2022
The Law in Action in Premodern Japan: A Comparative Perspective
Subject associations
EAS 253 / HIS 253 / MED 253
This seminar explores law in Japan, and the social, administrative, and judicial functions of law across different premodern societies. It uses centuries-old records of divorces, inheritance conflicts, and even murders as case studies mainly from precedent-based legal systems in the twelfth through fourteenth centuries. The chief focus is medieval Japan, seen in comparison to medieval England, whose 1215 Magna Carta inspires analogies to Japan's classic 1232 code (The Joei Formulary), and to the Mongol Yuan legal system in China.
Instructors
Thomas Conlan
Megan Gilbert
Spring 2022
Dangerous Bodies: Cross-Dressing, Asia, Transgression
Subject associations
EAS 314 / COM 398 / GSS 314 / ASA 314
This course examines "dangerous bodies" - bodies that transgress existing gender and racial norms in Chinese and Sinophone cultures. Situated at the intersection of literary, film, performance, gender and ethnic studies, this course provides an introduction to the shifting social meanings of the body in relation to historical masculinity, femininity, and Chineseness. We examine different cross-dressed figures, ranging from Mulan, cross-dressed male opera singer, WWII Japanese/Chinese spy, to experimental queer cinema, in a study that unpacks whether these transgressive bodies represent social change or a tool for restoring traditional norms.
Instructors
Erin Huang
Spring 2022
Contemporary Korean Media Cultures (SA)
Subject associations
EAS 365

Whether we look at its speed, connectivity and convergence, the geographic reach of its exports, or the contradictions that characterize its relationship to social reality, contemporary Korean media poses provocative questions about conditions of life in Korea and the mechanisms of communications and cultural technologies globally. Through examination of a range of practices across the mediascape (TV dramas, music, webtoons, films, advertisements, etc.) and phenomenon that have arisen from them (the Korean Wave, the rise of national sports heroes, etc.) the class will consider the force of contemporary media in shaping the very idea of Korea.

Instructors
Steven Chung
Spring 2022
Korean Travel Narratives, 1100s-1930s (EC)
Subject associations
EAS 369 / COM 365

Knowledge about the world transformed over history: civilization, empire, East-West encounter, and postcolonial homelessness are frames that link identity and space. Reading travelogues by Koreans and about Korea, we will pursue two goals. We will analyze the epistemic coordinates of travelogue that produces knowledge about self and other. And we will note the changing historical contexts around Korea, which defined the modes of mobility for shipwreck survivors, prisoners of war, Christian missionaries, Japanese colonial officials, and communist guerilla fighters. Korea will provide us with a concrete vantage point upon the larger world.

Instructors
Ksenia Chizhova
Spring 2022
Brainwashing, Conversion and Other Technologies of Belief Contagion
Subject associations
EAS 370
The seminar explores brainwashing and conversion in media discourses and practices, with a focus on Asia. Brainwashing and conversion are approached as contingent and exploitable figures spanning religious doctrine, forces of economic mobility, cross-cultural encounters, states of political subjectivity and gender and sex formations. Media forms include portrayals of brainwashing, control of networks and content, and ideas about media's hypnotic power.
Instructors
Steven Chung
Spring 2022
Everyday Life in Mao's China
Subject associations
EAS 375 / HUM 376
For three decades, Mao Zedong presided over one of the most ambitious social experiments in human history. This course explores everyday life in China in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s: the radical reordering of economic, political, and social relations; the shattering experiences of the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution; and the evolution of a party-state which governs China up to the present. While Maoist ideology and policies were homogenizing in intent and often in effect, this course will emphasize the ways in which the experiences of the Mao era were mediated through categories like gender, social status, and ethnicity.
Instructors
Joshua Freeman
Spring 2022
Pro-Sem in Chinese & Japanese Studies: Literary Theory and Intellectual History of East Asia
Subject associations
EAS 502
EAS 502 examines problems and possibility of research peculiar to the fields of East Asian Studies across the macro-region of East Asia, in an attempt to overcome nation-centric narratives and scholars' isolation in hyper-specialized research. The seminar maintains a transnational and transcultural approach, but also explores the possibility of methodological and theoretical reflection that transcends disciplinary divisions among students in East Asian Studies independently of their specialization.
Instructors
Paize Keulemans
Federico Marcon
Spring 2022
Early China: Early Chinese Historiography
Subject associations
EAS 504
Readings in the major historiography texts of early China, including Shangshu, Zuo zhuan, Shiji, and Hanshu, with further attention to recently excavated texts. Analysis of the defining features of early Chinese historiography in relation to early intellectual history. Comparison with selected works from ancient Mediterranean historiography (Thucydides, Herodotus, Sallust), and discussion of historiographic thought.
Instructors
Martin Kern
Spring 2022
Research Seminar in Ancient and Medieval Japanese History
Subject associations
EAS 526
This course is a research and writing seminar that introduces major historical methods of research in ancient and medieval Japan. In addition to weekly research assignments, students identify a research topic by the third week of the class, and complete a research paper at the end of the semester (entailing 15-20 pages). Instruction focuses on research methods and topics, although some reading of sources also occurs.
Instructors
Thomas Conlan
Spring 2022
Introduction to Kanbun
Subject associations
EAS 546
Introduction to the basics of reading Chinese-style Classical Japanese and its related forms. Texts: Literary and historical texts from both China and Japan.
Instructors
Keiko Ono
Spring 2022
The Quest for Health: Contemporary Debates on Harm, Medicine, and Ethics
Subject associations
EAS 548 / ANT 548
The course explores issues in medicine and global health with a focus on ethics. We address both ethics in the context of clinical decision-making and also the social, cultural, and economic "ethical field" of health care. Ever-expanding technological possibilities re-shape our social lives, extending them, giving greater control but taking it away. Treatments such as living donor organ transplantation, stem cell therapies, and physician-assisted suicide transform our understandings of life, death and what we expect from one another. Technologies such as glucometers bring new inequalities.
Instructors
Amy Borovoy
Spring 2022
Readings in Japanese Academic Style II
Subject associations
EAS 564
The second half of the two-semester course, which trains students in reading the particular style of Japanese academic writing. The second semester particularly focuses on academic writings from Meiji to the 1950s, including brief introduction of necessary Classical Japanese Grammar for this purpose. Course conducted in English.
Instructors
Keiko Ono
Spring 2022
Presentiments: Towards Modern Korean Literature
Subject associations
EAS 574

This course problematizes the ideas of "modern" and "literature" which were no more than hypotheses in turn-of-the-20th-century Korea. We trace the aesthetic and intellectual transformations in lineage novels, hybrid novels that test the boundaries of traditional form, sinsosol, essays, and early textbooks of Korean literature. As a result, rather than viewing the emergence of modern literature in Korea as a self-certain trajectory within the teleological timeline of the nation-state, we note the zones of ambiguity, hybridity, and dialog around it.

Instructors
Ksenia Chizhova
Spring 2022
Photographic Thought/Sensation/Materiality in Japanese Literary and Visual Media
Subject associations
EAS 575
As a vital medium of relation and exchange among mental and material worlds, photography has inflected the entangled conditions of possibility for literary and visual media in Japan in untold ways. This course examines the evolving contours of thought, sensation, and materiality provoked by the photographic encounters among a diverse set of textual and visual practices. Drawing on primary materials and criticism from literary and artistic contexts as well as secondary scholarship, this course explores the changing relations among media and moments of critical reflection afforded by photography in Japan.
Instructors
Franz Prichard
Spring 2022
Introduction to Chinese Philosophy
Subject associations
EAS 757

No description available

Spring 2022
Senior Thesis
Subject associations
EAS 984

Chinese-language courses (Spring 2022)

Spring 2022
Introductory Chinese I
Subject associations
CHI 1001
Introductory Chinese, (CHI 1001) and its subsequent course (CHI 1002), are introductory Chinese courses for true beginners. This course will be taught at half the pace of instruction compared to Elementary Chinese (CHI 101/CHI 102). The goal is to develop students' competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Both the Pinyin Romanization system and simplified characters will be used in class. After taking CHI 1001 and CHI 1002, students will develop basic abilities to handle simple survival situations in Chinese, to read and write over 300 Chinese characters, and be well prepared for more advanced and intensive study in Chinese.
Instructors
Ying Ou
Spring 2022
Elementary Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 102
Continuation of Chinese 101. To develop basic competence in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese.
Instructors
Qi Qi
Spring 2022
Intermediate Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 107
Continuing the intensive study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of modern cultural and social issues.
Instructors
Jieyun Zhu
Spring 2022
Intensive Intermediate Chinese
Subject associations
CHI 108
An intensive course covering 105 and 107 in one semester for students who have finished 103 which covers 101 and 102. The course will emphasize reading and writing skills and the analysis of grammar. After 108, students are ready for third year courses.
Instructors
Yinqiu Ma
Spring 2022
Introduction to Classical Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 302
The purpose of this course is, first and foremost, to introduce the fundamental grammar of classical Chinese and to read short, original texts, from different periods and genres. It also provides theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as conceptions of filial piety, warfare, conflicts between righteousness and profit. Questions such as these were at the heart of Chinese intellectual debates.
Instructors
Jue Lu
Spring 2022
Third-Year Modern Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 304
A continuation of CHI 303, designed to improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of newspaper essays and commentaries.
Instructors
Ying Ou
Jing Wang
Spring 2022
Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 306
A continuation of 305, designed to further improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of essays published in contemporary Chinese newspapers and magazines.
Instructors
Yu Zhang
Xin Zou
Spring 2022
Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 404
A continuation of 403. This course consists of reading and discussion of selections from Chinese media on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.
Instructors
Luanfeng Huang
Spring 2022
Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II
Subject associations
CHI 406
This course consists of reading and discussion based on newspaper articles and essays by famous Chinese intellectuals on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Students will also be exposed to literary writings.
Instructors
Fang-Yen Hsieh
Spring 2022
Readings in Classic Chinese Short Stories
Subject associations
CHI 412 / EAS 412
Focuses on reading and discussing selections from Feng Menglong's Sanyan, the most popular and well-known collection of Classic Chinese short stories published in the late sixteenth century. One class, two hours of discussion, conducted in Chinese.
Instructors
Jieyun Zhu
Xin Zou

Japanese-language courses (Spring 2022)

Spring 2022
Elementary Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 102
Continuation of JPN 101, which emphasizes the basic four skills to achieve survival proficiency level.
Instructors
Hisae Matsui
Shinji Sato
Tomoko Shibata
Yukari Tokumasu
Spring 2022
Intermediate Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 107
The course aims at a thorough mastery of modern colloquial Japanese by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points covered in JPN 101, 102, and 105. It is also intended to give students advanced vocabulary and expressions through aural-oral drills, readings, and written exercises. Emphasis will increasingly be on reading, but oral work will still comprise a fundamental aspect of the course.
Instructors
Hisae Matsui
Megumi Watanabe
Spring 2022
Advanced Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 302
The course is designed to further students' proficiency in the four language skills aiming for ACTFL-ETS advanced level. Learning materials include the Japanese anime "Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi (Spirited Away)" and selected readings from works in the original language.
Instructors
Yukari Tokumasu
Megumi Watanabe
Spring 2022
Integrative Advanced Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 306
Four skills approach to advanced Japanese with a focus on reading, listening and speaking. Reading materials include novels, essays, etc. Video materials are also used to enhance listening skills. The goal of this course is "advanced" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors
Tomoko Shibata
Spring 2022
Readings in Modern Japanese II
Subject associations
JPN 402 / EAS 402
This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. While reading is under focus, speaking, listening, and writing are intensively practiced. Materials include novels, essays, articles, and films.
Instructors
Yukari Tokumasu
Spring 2022
Readings in Classical Japanese
Subject associations
JPN 404
Selections from outstanding works of Classical Japanese prose and verse from Nara to early Showa period, particularly in the genres of history, philosophy, and poetry.
Instructors
Keiko Ono
Spring 2022
Contemporary Japanese Language and Culture II
Subject associations
JPN 408
This course emphasizes continued development of four skills used in academic or professional settings. Materials include novels, essays, reports, films, and documentaries. The goal of this course is "superior" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors
Shinji Sato
Tomoko Shibata

Korean-language courses (Spring 2022)

Spring 2022
Elementary Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 102
A continuation of KOR 101. Continued development of proficiency in basic communication by balancing four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Instructors
Susie Kim
Hwichan Oh
Namseok Yong
Yuseon Yun
Spring 2022
Elementary Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 102
A continuation of KOR 101. Continued development of proficiency in basic communication by balancing four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Instructors
Susie Kim
Hwichan Oh
Namseok Yong
Yuseon Yun
Spring 2022
Intermediate Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 107
A continuation of KOR 105. Continued development of four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in Korean. Complex grammatical structures are taught while the basics are reviewed. Idiomatic expressions are introduced. Journals are kept for writing practice.
Instructors
Susie Kim
Hwichan Oh
Namseok Yong
Spring 2022
Intermediate Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 107
A continuation of KOR 105. Continued development of four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in Korean. Complex grammatical structures are taught while the basics are reviewed. Idiomatic expressions are introduced. Journals are kept for writing practice.
Instructors
Susie Kim
Hwichan Oh
Namseok Yong
Spring 2022
Intensive Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 108
A continuation of Korean 103. This course covers Intermediate Korean material, focusing on complex grammatical structures, reading, and writing. Journals are kept for writing practice. Students who have successfully completed KOR 103 and 108 are placed in KOR 301 for further practice of conversation. Those with strong conversational skills may also test into KOR 303, Integrative Korean, which focuses more on literacy.
Instructors
Seung Hee Cho
Yuseon Yun
Spring 2022
Intensive Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 108
A continuation of Korean 103. This course covers Intermediate Korean material, focusing on complex grammatical structures, reading, and writing. Journals are kept for writing practice. Students who have successfully completed KOR 103 and 108 are placed in KOR 301 for further practice of conversation. Those with strong conversational skills may also test into KOR 303, Integrative Korean, which focuses more on literacy.
Instructors
Seunghee Cho
Yuseon Yun
Spring 2022
Advanced Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 302
A continuation of KOR 301. Continued development of proficiency in speaking and reading through short readings and class discussion. Vocabulary learning and discourse skills are emphasized.
Instructors
Seung Hee Cho
Susie Kim
Spring 2022
Advanced Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 302
A continuation of KOR 301. Continued development of proficiency in speaking and reading through short readings and class discussion. Vocabulary learning and discourse skills are emphasized.
Instructors
Seunghee Cho
Susie Kim
Spring 2022
Integrative Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 308
This course is a continuation of KOR303, focusing on stabilizing literacy development through a variety of authentic reading materials, class discussions, presentations and various writing assignments. Expanding advanced-level vocabulary based on Chinese characters is also emphasized.
Instructors
Namseok Yong
Spring 2022
Integrative Korean II
Subject associations
KOR 308
This course is a continuation of KOR303, focusing on stabilizing literacy development through a variety of authentic reading materials, class discussions, presentations and various writing assignments. Expanding advanced-level vocabulary based on Chinese characters is also emphasized.
Instructors
Namseok Yong
Spring 2022
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture II
Subject associations
KOR 402
Reading and discussion of thoughts and issues within contemporary Korean society. Readings are drawn from a variety of sociocultural and historical as well as sociolinguistic topics including family, marriage, gender issues, education, technology, and the changes of the language in both South and North Korea. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors
Seung Hee Cho
Spring 2022
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture II
Subject associations
KOR 402
Reading and discussion of thoughts and issues within contemporary Korean society. Readings are drawn from a variety of sociocultural and historical as well as sociolinguistic topics including family, marriage, gender issues, education, technology, and the changes of the language in both South and North Korea. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors
Seunghee Cho