Courses

EAS Courses (Fall 2021)

Medieval Asian Worlds: Korea, Japan, China, Inner and South Asia 300 CE-1700 CE
This course explores the Middle Ages (300-1700) of the East Asian world (China, Japan, and Korea) as well as the varying links between these polities and Inner and South Asia. Particular focus will be devoted to the rise of Buddhist notions of kingship in South Asia and their transmission to the major states of Inner and East Asia, as well as the rise of notions of ethnicity, and the creation of distinct states and cultures of China, Korea and Japan. Topics will be chronological, emphasizing the movements of ideas and peoples, with a framework centered on influential figures who propagated the spread of goods and ideas across borders.
Instructors: Thomas Donald Conlan
Writing and Culture of Premodern Korea
This course is an introductory survey of the cultural history of premodern Korea-from early times until the turn of the twentieth century-focused on the primary sources. We will read various original materials (in English translation): myths, state histories, diaries, travelogues, and works of fiction, among others. Topics covered in this course include the imagination of the origins in myth, the idea of Confucian governance, everyday life and entertainment in Choson (1392-1910), and Korea's opening to the west in the late nineteenth century.
Instructors: Ksenia Chizhova
Japanese Society and Culture
Japan became the first non-Western nation to industrialize and modernize in the late 19th century, determined to fend off foreign invasion. Decades later, Japan challenged Americans to imagine alternative futures through its economic success and later its "soft power." The course will consider change and continuity in Japan and how Japan's current status as a stable, slowly growing economy informs our views of capitalism and society in the current era. Topics include gender, labor, and corporate welfare; youth socialization; marriage and divorce; race, "Japaneseness" and citizenship; diasporic identities; sub-cultures and popular culture.
Instructors: Amy Beth Borovoy
Chinese Cinemas
This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese cinemas in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. From postwar musicals and pan-Asian blockbusters, to new wave avant-garde films and experimental documentaries, the diversity of Chinese cinemas reflects cinema's relations to global capitalism, Asia's democratization movements, financial crises, and the arrival of (post)socialism. Creating urban nomads, songstresses, daydreamers, travelers, and terrorists, Chinese cinemas put on full display the forces of globalization in shaping the aesthetics and politics of film. Selections broadly include popular commercial films to rare art house productions.
Instructors: Erin Yu-Tien Huang
Japan's Media Mix: Anime/Cinema/Gaming
This course surveys Japan's vibrant media mix cultures spanning the histories of anime, cinema and gaming through the intersections of film and media studies. Charting the emergence of media mix cultures and "new" media technologies from silent film to augmented reality in Japan, this course introduces students to major works of anime (animated feature films, television series, and other formats), cinema, and video games. We will examine the changing contours of work and play, sentiment and sensation, thought and materiality, and the forms of mediation and social relation that defined Japan's modern media mix ecologies and platforms.
Instructors: Franz K. Prichard
Junior Seminar
This seminar teaches the research and writing skills needed to produce a thesis as an East Asian studies major. Through mini-projects and guest lectures, the class introduces the various disciplines and methodologies used to study East Asia, including history, anthropology, political science, history, literature, and media studies. In addition, the class teaches techniques of research and writing: how to formulate a research question, find and use appropriate sources, write a research proposal, craft a compelling introduction and convincing conclusion.
Instructors: Amy Beth Borovoy
Japanese Film & Media Studies
Study of contemporary Japan through major works of film, photography, and visual culture. The course will explore defining transformations in urban and media ecologies, experiences of development and disaster, and the contentious environmental histories that inform contemporary Japan. The course will foster critical skills in interdisciplinary methods and transnational approaches to the study of film and visual media from Japan in regional and global contexts.
Instructors: Franz K. Prichard
Postwar Japanese Narrative: Modern to Postmodern
This course examines postwar Japanese experience through major literary, cinematic, and intellectual achievements. The objective is first to analyze a multitude of struggles in the aftermath of the Asia-Pacific War, and then to inquire into the nature of post-industrial prosperity in capitalist consumerism and the emergence of postmodernism. The course will cover representative postwar figures such as, Oe Kenzaburo, Dazai Osamu, Mishima Yukio, as well as contemporary writers such as Murakami Haruki. Topics include the rise of democratic ideas, unsolved issues of war memories, and the tension between serious and "popular" fiction writing.
Instructors: Atsuko Ueda
Strange Korean Families
Using family as a lens and a theme that brings together an array of vastly different literary, filmic, and theoretical works, this class will examine key moments in the history of Korea from 2019 to old times. We will look into disenchanted families, violent families, cyborg families, mixed race families, immigrant families, South and North Korean families, royal families, and more. Maintaining the longue-duree historical perspective, we will ponder on the ethical and aesthetic premises of kinship and family as modes of configuring human reciprocity and ways to imagine and live life.
Instructors: Ksenia Chizhova
The Warrior Culture of Japan
This course explores the 'rise' of the warrior culture of Japan. In addition to providing a better understanding of the judicial and military underpinnings of Japan's military 'rule' and the nature of medieval warfare, this course shows how warriors have been perceived as a dominant force in Japanese history, and will explore how the samurai myth was created in more recent times. This course culminates in an extended research paper. The goals of this course are to examine the role of warriors in Japanese history, to introduce historical debates concerning this topic, and to explore the use of primary sources in translation.
Instructors: Thomas Donald Conlan
Early China: The Anhui University Shijing Manuscript
In this seminar, we read selected poems from the Anhui University Shijing bamboo manuscript from ca. 300 BCE that was published in 2019 and includes 57 poems known from the ancient Classic of Poetry. In closely comparing these poems to those in the received Shijing as well as to other manuscript evidence, we analyze the manuscript text in detail from the perspectives of paleography, historical phonology, and codicology. Thus, the seminar introduces students to the principal technical disciplines in reading an ancient Chinese manuscript while at the same time exploring the formation of early Chinese poetry and of the Shijing anthology.
Instructors: Martin Kern
Literature in Medieval Zen
Over the 14th-16th centuries, Zen monasteries were the most prolific centers of learning in Japan, patronized by the warrior elite as pundits of continental high culture. However, much of their vast written output has fallen between the cracks of modern academic disciplines. This course introduces the major literary genres associated with this milieu: verse (including gatha and painting inscriptions), tracts, shomono (vernacular commentaries), and formal epistles. Particular attention is devoted to continuities and differences with continental precedent, and to the interaction between aesthetic, devotional, and pedagogic frames of meaning.
Instructors: Brian R. Steininger
Sources in Ancient and Medieval Japanese History
This course provides an introduction to the written sources of Japanese history from 800-1600. Instruction focuses on reading and translating a variety of documentary genres, although court chronicles and some visual sources are introduced in class as well. Each week entails the translation of several short documents. Some research resources are also introduced. Weekly assignments include documents which are published on Princeton's komonjo website. In a presentation of the final translation project and analysis is required during the final class and a 12-15 page paper is due on Dean's Day.
Instructors: Thomas Donald Conlan
Readings in Chinese Literature: Poetry of the Northern Song
This course surveys Northern Song poetry, focusing on new styles and genres appearing in the 11th century. Genres include: regulated verse; song lyrics; remarks on poetry (shihua); yuefu and other musical texts. Authors include Ouyang Xiu, Mei Yaochen, Su Shi, Huang Tingjian, Yan Shu, Liu Yong, Wang Anshi, Sima Guang. Secondary scholarship in Chinese, Japanese, and English focus on genres and writers. We consider Song poetry in the framework of Chinese literary history, aesthetics of song lyrics, and new poetic styles.
Instructors: Anna Marshall Shields
Readings in Chinese Literature: Chinese Theater, 900-1900
An introduction to Chinese opera from the Song until the Republican period. Opera texts are read in conjunction with issues pertinent to cultural history: the architectural history of the stage, the urban and rural environment of opera, the global circulation of opera, the relationship between religious ritual and literary performance, as well as issues of physicality, sexuality, gender, patronage, and class. Primary texts include the Yuan opera Zhao shi gu er (and the Voltaire play Orphelin de la Chine), Tang Xianzu's Mudan ting, Li Yu's Qingzhong pu, Kong Shangren's Taohua shan, and Chen Sen's novel Pinhua baojian.
Instructors: Paize Keulemans
Modern Japanese Prose
A study of selected major authors and literary trends in modern Japan, with an emphasis on the Meiji and Taisho periods.
Instructors: Atsuko Ueda
Readings in Kanbun
This course focuses on various types of Japanese kanbun, including waka kanbun (Japanese vernacular kanbun) from Nara to Meiji era. Basic knowledge of classical Japanese grammar and kanbun kundoku reading is required.
Instructors: Keiko Ono
Readings in Japanese Academic Style
The two-semester course is designed for students in Chinese studies, who already possess reading fluency in Chinese. Its goal is to train these students in reading the particular style of Japanese academic writing; at the end of the year, students will be able to independently read modern Japanese scholarship on China. Students take this course after at least one year of modern Japanese (JPN 101/102). The course does not train all four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening; instead it is devoted entirely to rapidly develop the necessary reading skills in Japanese academic style. The course is conducted in English.
Instructors: Keiko Ono
Critical Trespasses: Theorizing Political and Intellectual Borders
This seminar structures an encounter with theoretical writings about nation, subjectivity, power and culture, which are assembled for their relevance to "East Asia." The collection is not meant to be comprehensive, but rather intended to facilitate discussion of work that has shaped and revised active intellectual traditions. It starts with reflection on "area studies" as an academic discipline and moves to considerations of national identity and nationalism. It proceeds to reflections on politics and aesthetics and finally turns to practices - writing, media, technology - that embody and inflect these conceptual formations.
Instructors: Steven Chung

Chinese-language Courses (Fall 2021)

Introductory Chinese II
Introductory Chinese (CHI 1002) is a continuation of CHI 1001, an introductory course for true beginners. It is taught at half the instructional pace of First Year Chinese (CHI 101). The goal of this course is to develop students' four basic communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, using both the Pinyin Romanization phonetic system and simplified (modern) Chinese characters. By the end of this course, students will be able to handle simple "survival situations" in Chinese, read and write over 300 Chinese characters, and engage in more advanced and intensive study of Chinese in the future.
Elementary Chinese I
An introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese, emphasizing oral-aural facility and the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Intensive Elementary Chinese
Chinese 103 is designed for students who already have some familiarity with spoken Mandarin or any Chinese dialect. This course will emphasize the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Intermediate Chinese I
While reinforcing the knowledge students have acquired thus far, this course will further develop the students' audio-lingual proficiency and bring their reading and writing ability to a higher level.
Introduction to Classical Chinese I
Chinese 301 provides basic training for students in classical Chinese and introduces students to theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as the concept of Dao, life and death, Confucian ethics, etc. Each theme consists of passages selected from Chinese classics and short essays or stories full of wisdom and wit from later dynasties. This course will not only improve your four skills in Chinese language (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) but also enhances your general understanding of traditional Chinese philosophy and culture.
Third-Year Modern Chinese I
This course is designed to further develop students' overall language skills through reading and discussion of contemporary issues published in Chinese media.
Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese I
Chinese 305 will further develop student's overall language skills through readings and discussion of contemporary issues published in Chinese media. This course is designed for students who have familiarity with spoken Mandarin or any Chinese dialect.
Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I
This course consists of reading and discussion of selections from Chinese media on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.
Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I
This course consists of reading and discussion based on newspaper articles and essays by famous Chinese intellectuals on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Students will also be exposed to literary writings.
Readings in Modern Chinese Intellectual History
This course is designed for students who have had advanced training in modern Chinese. The focus of readings is modern Chinese intellectual history. Topics that will be discussed include language reform, women's emancipation, the encounter of western civilization, the rise of communism, etc.

Japanese-Language Courses (Fall 2021)

Elementary Japanese I
An intensive introduction to modern Japanese stressing oral-aural facility, but including an introduction to written Japanese.
Instructors: Hisae Matsui, Shinji Sato, Tomoko Shibata, Yukari Tokumasu
Intermediate Japanese I
This course aims to give a thorough mastery of modern colloquial Japanese (Tokyo speech) by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points and more advanced vocabulary and grammar. Students will reinforce four major skills by using speaking - listening drills, readings, and written exercises.
Instructors: Hisae Matsui, Megumi Watanabe
Advanced Japanese I
This course is designed to further students' reading ability. Students will have ample opportunity to hear and use increasingly more sophisticated vocabulary and grammatical constructions through discussion and composition. Japanese video will also be incorporated into the course. Reading materials include "Tobira" and selected readings from works in the original language.
Instructors: Yukari Tokumasu, Megumi Watanabe
Integrative Advanced Japanese I
This course focuses on speaking, reading, listening, and writing with the goal of preparing students to continue on to JPN 306 in the Spring. Reading materials include novels, essays, etc. Video materials are also used to enhance listening skills. The goal of this course is "advanced" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors: Tomoko Shibata
Readings in Modern Japanese I
This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. Students will (1) discuss various issues using dramas, short novels and editorials, and (2) learn business Japanese. Through these activities, students will develop critical thinking skills as well as Japanese language skills.
Instructors: Yukari Tokumasu
Introduction to Classical Japanese
Introduction to the fundamentals of classical Japanese grammar. This course trains students to read premodern Japanese historical and literary texts. Texts: Makura no Soshi, Taketori Monogatari, Ujishui Monogatari, Hyakunin Isshu, etc.
Instructors: Keiko Ono
Contemporary Japanese Language and Culture I
This course emphasizes continued development of the four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) used in academic or professional settings. Materials include novels, essays, reports, films, and documentaries. The goal of this course is "superior" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors: Shinji Sato, Tomoko Shibata

Korean-language Courses (Fall 2021)

Elementary Korean I
Elementary Korean is designed for beginning students who intend to build a solid foundation for further study in the Korean language. The course provides four balanced language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - needed for basic communication. It emphasizes the ability to use Korean appropriately and introduces students to useful information concerning culture and daily life in Korea.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, Susie Kim, Namseok Yong
Elementary Korean I
Elementary Korean is designed for beginning students who intend to build a solid foundation for further study in the Korean language. The course provides four balanced language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - needed for basic communication. It emphasizes the ability to use Korean appropriately and introduces students to useful information concerning culture and daily life in Korea.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, Susie Kim, Namseok Yong
Intensive Korean I
The first part of Intensive Korean is designed for heritage students who have already had considerable amount of exposure to the Korean language and culture but have not received any formal instruction before their arriving at Princeton. It covers the Elementary Korean material focusing on vocabulary building, grammar, reading and writing.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Intensive Korean I
The first part of Intensive Korean is designed for heritage students who have already had considerable amount of exposure to the Korean language and culture but have not received any formal instruction before their arriving at Princeton. It covers the Elementary Korean material focusing on vocabulary building, grammar, reading and writing.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Intermediate Korean I
Intermediate Korean is designed for students who have learned the basics of the Korean language and want to improve their language skills. Complex sentences and grammar are covered while the basics are reviewed. Balancing four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- is emphasized. Journals are kept to practice better self-expression in Korean. Cultural aspects of language learning are reinforced through readings, media, and virtual reality contents.
Instructors: Seung Hee Cho, Susie Kim, Namseok Yong
Intermediate Korean I
Intermediate Korean is designed for students who have learned the basics of the Korean language and want to improve their language skills. Complex sentences and grammar are covered while the basics are reviewed. Balancing four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- is emphasized. Journals are kept to practice better self-expression in Korean. Cultural aspects of language learning are reinforced through readings, media, and virtual reality contents.
Instructors: Seunghee Cho, Susie Kim, Namseok Yong
Advanced Korean I
Advanced Korean is designed to develop fluency in both oral and literary skills. Expansion of vocabulary, practice in reading comprehension as well as active skills of conversation and writing are stressed through short readings and class discussion. Readings include different styles of writings on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history.
Instructors: Seung Hee Cho, Susie Kim
Advanced Korean I
Advanced Korean is designed to develop fluency in both oral and literary skills. Expansion of vocabulary, practice in reading comprehension as well as active skills of conversation and writing are stressed through short readings and class discussion. Readings include different styles of writings on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history.
Instructors: Seunghee Cho, Susie Kim
Integrative Korean I
This fourth-year Korean course is designed to promote students' proficiency to the advanced-mid level and to enhance their continued development of literacy skills in Korean. Various authentic reading and audiovisual materials are reviewed in class discussion, presentation skills are emphasized, and a wider range of formal vocabulary is introduced.
Instructors: Namseok Yong
Integrative Korean I
This fourth-year Korean course is designed to promote students' proficiency to the advanced-mid level and to enhance their continued development of literacy skills in Korean. Various authentic reading and audiovisual materials are reviewed in class discussion, presentation skills are emphasized, and a wider range of formal vocabulary is introduced.
Instructors: Namseok Yong

EAS Courses (Spring 2021)

The Origins of Japanese Culture and Civilization: A History of Japan until 1600
This course is designed to introduce the culture and history of Japan, and to examine how one understands and interprets the past. In addition to considering how a culture, a society, and a state develop, we will try to reconstruct the tenor of life in "ancient" and "medieval" Japan and chart how patterns of Japanese civilization shifted through time.
Instructors: Thomas Donald Conlan
Chinese Martial Arts Classics: Fiction, Film, Fact
This course provides an overview of Chinese martial arts fiction and film from earliest times to the present day. The focus will be on the close-reading of literary, art-historical, and cinematic texts, but will also include discussion of the significance of these works against their broader historical and social background. Topics to be discussed: the literary/cinematic pleasure of watching violence, the relationship between violence and the law, gender ambiguity and the woman warrior, the imperial and (trans)national order of martial arts cinema, and the moral and physical economy of vengeance.
Instructors: Paize Keulemans
Introduction to Chinese Literature
An introduction to some of the most important texts, writers, and topics of Classical Literature from antiquity through the Song dynasty. All readings are in English, and no previous background in Chinese or Asian culture is required. Topics include: nature of the Chinese language; the beginnings of poetry; development of narrative and historical writing; classical Chinese poetics; literature of protest, dissent, and political satire; love poetry; religious and philosophical ideas in Chinese literature.
Instructors: Anna Marshall Shields
Nomadic Empires: From the Scythian Confederation to the Mongol Conquest
In telling histories of East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and Europe, various groups of nomadic people often loomed large in the background and served as the foil to the travail of their sedentary neighbors. In this course we put the nomadic peoples of Inner Asia front and center, and ask how the nomadic way of life and mode of state building served as agents of change in pre-modern Eurasia.
Instructors: Xin Wen
The Passionate Eye: Documentary Film in East Asia
The seminar will encourage students to think critically about the documentary as artistic medium and as socio-political practice. Some important questions will focus on the form itself: who has produced and watched these films and through what sorts of technologies? What are the codes through which documentaries make sense of their subjects and how do these change? Other questions will have wider scope: how can filmmaking impact politics and culture? How does it deal with the gap between reality and representation? What are the ethical issues of such work? What, if anything, is distinct about the life of documentary films in East Asia?
Instructors: Steven Chung
Dangerous Bodies: Cross-Dressing, Asia, Transgression
This course examines "dangerous bodies" - bodies that transgress existing gender and racial norms in Chinese and Sinophone cultures. Situated at the intersection of literary, film, performance, gender and ethnic studies, this course provides an introduction to the shifting social meanings of the body in relation to historical masculinity, femininity, and Chineseness. We examine different cross-dressed figures, ranging from Mulan, cross-dressed male opera singer, WWII Japanese/Chinese spy, to experimental queer cinema, in a study that unpacks whether these transgressive bodies represent social change or a tool for restoring traditional norms.
Instructors: Erin Yu-Tien Huang
Chinese Poetry
In this seminar we closely study ancient and medieval Chinese poetry, with emphasis on the formative stages of the Chinese textual tradition. While all texts will be read in translation, we also explore the ways in which the classical Chinese language shaped this poetry in its unique characteristics and possibilities of expression. In addition, we discuss in depth key texts of Chinese literary thought in their aesthetic, philosophical, social, and historical dimensions. Knowledge of the Chinese language is neither required nor expected.
Instructors: Martin Kern
Cosmopolitan Her: Writing in Late Capitalism
This course introduces students to twenty-first-century Asian women writers (Japan, Korea, China) whose works achieved global popularity through translation in the past two decades. Written by writers living in East Asian countries dealing with capitalist developments, financial crises, and neoliberal free trade agreements, the texts collectively suggest the global interest and transmission of women's rights and LGBTQ movements in Asia and beyond. We explore, firstly, the meaning of "capitalism" as seen by the author in each text, and secondly, a commodified urban-based cosmopolitan culture that depends on the continued orientalism of Asia.
Instructors: Erin Yu-Tien Huang
North Korean Imaginaries
North Korea is the subject of an array of often contradictory political and aesthetic representations, each of which make claims to truth. This course sets out to scrutinize these very real and productive imaginaries. Primary engagements will include official speeches and documents, artistic productions and defector testimonies from North Korea, as well as historical research, policy analysis, journalism, and non-state activities from outside the nation's borders. The task of understanding this most troubled of states will be challenged by visits from journalists, former intelligence or policy consultants, defectors, and religious groups.
Instructors: Steven Chung
Uyghur History: A Survey
This seminar surveys the history of the Uyghurs, a Turkic Muslim community of about eleven million living mostly in northwest China. The course draws on a wide range of scholarship on Uyghur history, culture, and religion in order to offer a broad overview of Uyghur history from ancient times to the present. Students will encounter numerous native voices directly through translations of Uyghur literature and historical materials. Through discussion, readings, and written work building to a final paper, students will come to understand Uyghur history in contexts ranging from ancient nomadic empires to twentieth-century Communism.
Instructors: Joshua Lerman Freeman
For a Language To Come: A Creative/Critical Media Workshop
Participants will develop multi-sensorial approaches to the study of diverse media. The workshop fosters new conceptual and aesthetic vocabularies for tracing the trans-disciplinary circulations of media today. Assembling the works of Japanese female artists, writers, and musicians together with scholarly perspectives on Afro-Asian intimacies, decolonial epistemologies, feminist cartographies, posthuman subjectivities, urban ecologies, and more, students collaboratively forge novel understandings of media thinking/making at the edges of the "legible" territories of knowledge.
Instructors: Franz K. Prichard
Early China: Text and Bibliography in Early China
The seminar examines the gradual evolution of early Chinese textuality from the pre-imperial through the early imperial period, with particular emphasis on questions of materiality and sociology of text; authorship, compilation, and circulation; canon formation and the rise of commentary; and classification and bibliography. Readings are in classical Chinese and in various languages of modern scholarship. Languages of instruction: English and Chinese.
Instructors: Martin Kern, Jianwei Xu
Japanese Philosophy: A Modern History, 1600-1945
This seminar has two main goals. The first is to offer a survey of the philosophical production of Japan from the Tokugawa period to the end of the Second World War, with a focus on the socio-political and intellectual conditions that favored the development of sophisticated philosophical discourses, their terminology, recurring themes, and changing authorizing/legitimating strategies. The second is to investigate on the heuristic adequacy of the Western term "philosophy" to understand forms and style of speculative thinking in Japan.
Instructors: Federico Marcon
Chinese Literature: The Verses of Chu (Chuci)
Through close readings of the original poetry and historical sources, we analyze the anthology of the Verses of Chu (Chuci) in its aesthetic, historical, and hermeneutic dimensions, with particular attention to the formation and the nature of early Chinese textuality. Drawing on a wider range of early historical, literary, and philosophical texts, and using traditional as well as modern commentaries, we contextualize the songs in late Warring States and Han literary and intellectual culture.
Instructors: Martin Kern
Readings in Chinese Literature: Outlaws of the March
This course focuses on the first vernacular novel, Outlaws of the Marsh, some of its central themes, and its long history of remediation. We read a good part of the novel, investigate the histories and operas that preceded it, and look at the films, manga, and video games that based on it. We compare editions, illustrations, and commentaries, and trace multi-media adaptations across national boundaries. In addition, we investigate concepts crucial to Ming dynasty literature: the space of the jianghu, the history of collecting, the politics of (wild) history, the role of ritual, and the explosion of print culture.
Instructors: Paize Keulemans
Classical Japanese Prose: Life Writing in Late Antiquity
Examines genres of life writing in the 9th-11th centuries, in both Sinitic and vernacular modes, including representative examples of memoir, daily record, biography (official, monastic, and literary), and eulogy. Introduces core debates in literary historiography and research bibliography for the study of classical Japan.
Instructors: Brian R. Steininger
Modern Japanese Prose
A study of selected major authors and literary trends in modern Japan, with an emphasis on the Meiji and Taisho periods.
Instructors: Atsuko Ueda
Introduction to Kanbun
Introduction to the basics of reading Chinese-style Classical Japanese and its related forms. Texts: Literary and historical texts from both China and Japan.
Instructors: Keiko Ono
Unlearning Japanese Photography with/in Planetary Decoloniality
This seminar fosters an interdisciplinary understanding of Japanese photography inspired by the transformative possibilities of planetary decoloniality. Informed by postcolonial, anti-racist, feminist, and eco-critical modes of thought, we critically examine the geopolitical, institutional, disciplinary, and aesthetic boundaries that govern Japanese photography's unruly materialities and histories. Through readings, photographic materials, and discussions with photographers, curators, critics, and scholars, the seminar intervenes with/in a planetary context of decolonizing the conditions of knowledge production today.
Instructors: Franz K. Prichard
Chang'an: China's Medieval Metropolis
With a walled city of thirty square miles and a population of more than one million, Chang'an, capital of the Tang dynasty, was the largest city in the world at the time. Through reading texts in different genres including official history, governmental documents, literary collections, anecdotes, legal codes, and stone inscriptions along with secondary scholarship, this course introduces the political, ritual, and economic structures of the city, and explores the lives of its citizens that in different ways either maintained or challenged these structures.
Instructors: Xin Wen
Readings in Japanese Academic Style II
The second half of the two-semester course, which trains students in reading the particular style of Japanese academic writing. The second semester particularly focuses on academic writings from Meiji to the 1950s, including brief introduction of necessary Classical Japanese Grammar for this purpose. Course conducted in English.
Instructors: Keiko Ono
Readings in Ancient and Medieval Japanese History
This course is designed to introduce fundamental themes and debates about ancient and medieval Japanese history, and how conceptualizations of Japan have changed over time from the third century CE through 1600. Approximately two books, or a comparable number of articles, are required each week, and wherever possible, a brief passage of Japanese scholarship is presented as well. Reading knowledge of modern Japanese is desirable.
Instructors: Thomas Donald Conlan
Chinese Politics
No description available
Instructors: Rory Truex
Readings in Tang Poetry
No description available
Instructors: Anna Marshall Shields
Junior Independent Work
Senior Departmental Exam

Chinese-language courses (Spring 2021)

Introductory Chinese I
Introductory Chinese, (CHI 1001) and its subsequent course (CHI 1002), are introductory Chinese courses for true beginners. This course will be taught at half the pace of instruction compared to Elementary Chinese (CHI 101/CHI 102). The goal is to develop students' competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Both the Pinyin Romanization system and simplified characters will be used in class. After taking CHI 1001 and CHI 1002, students will develop basic abilities to handle simple survival situations in Chinese, to read and write over 300 Chinese characters, and be well prepared for more advanced and intensive study in Chinese.
Instructors: Qi Qi
Elementary Chinese II
Continuation of Chinese 101. To develop basic competence in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese.
Instructors: Luanfeng Huang, Jue Lu, Fang Yan, Yu Zhang
Intermediate Chinese II
Continuing the intensive study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of modern cultural and social issues.
Instructors: Xinyue Huang, Yinqiu Ma, Ying Ou, Fang Yan, Jieyun Zhu
Intensive Intermediate Chinese
An intensive course covering 105 and 107 in one semester for students who have finished 103 which covers 101 and 102. The course will emphasize reading and writing skills and the analysis of grammar. After 108, students are ready for third year courses.
Instructors: Ying Ou, Qi Qi
Introduction to Classical Chinese II
The purpose of this course is, first and foremost, to introduce the fundamental grammar of classical Chinese and to read short, original texts, from different periods and genres. It also provides theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as conceptions of filial piety, warfare, conflicts between righteousness and profit. Questions such as these were at the heart of Chinese intellectual debates.
Instructors: Jue Lu
Third-Year Modern Chinese II
A continuation of CHI 303, designed to improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of newspaper essays and commentaries.
Instructors: Luanfeng Huang, Xinyue Huang, Xin Zou
Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese II
A continuation of 305, designed to further improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of essays published in contemporary Chinese newspapers and magazines.
Instructors: Luanfeng Huang, Xinyue Huang
Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II
A continuation of 403. This course consists of reading and discussion of selections from Chinese media on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.
Instructors: Yinqiu Ma
Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II
This course consists of reading and discussion based on newspaper articles and essays by famous Chinese intellectuals on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Students will also be exposed to literary writings.
Instructors: Yu Zhang
Readings in Classic Chinese Short Stories
Focuses on reading and discussing selections from Feng Menglong's Sanyan, the most popular and well-known collection of Classic Chinese short stories published in the late sixteenth century. One class, two hours of discussion, conducted in Chinese.
Instructors: Jieyun Zhu, Xin Zou

Japanese-language courses (Spring 2021)

Elementary Japanese II
Continuation of JPN 101, which emphasizes the basic four skills to achieve survival proficiency level.
Instructors: Hisae Matsui, Tomoko Shibata, Yukari Tokumasu, Naoko Takano Warren
Intermediate Japanese II
The course aims at a thorough mastery of modern colloquial Japanese by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points covered in JPN 101, 102, and 105. It is also intended to give students advanced vocabulary and expressions through aural-oral drills, readings, and written exercises. Emphasis will increasingly be on reading, but oral work will still comprise a fundamental aspect of the course.
Instructors: Hisae Matsui, Yukari Tokumasu, Megumi Watanabe
Advanced Japanese II
The course is designed to further students' proficiency in the four language skills aiming for ACTFL-ETS advanced level. Learning materials include the Japanese anime "Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi (Spirited Away)" and selected readings from works in the original language.
Instructors: Tomoko Shibata, Megumi Watanabe
Integrative Advanced Japanese II
Four skills approach to advanced Japanese with a focus on reading, listening and speaking. Reading materials include novels, essays, etc. Video materials are also used to enhance listening skills. The goal of this course is "advanced" level according to the ACTFL/ETS guidelines.
Instructors: Tomoko Shibata
Readings in Modern Japanese II
This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. While reading is under focus, speaking, listening, and writing are intensively practiced. Materials include novels, essays, articles, and films.
Instructors: Yukari Tokumasu
Readings in Classical Japanese
Selections from outstanding works of Classical Japanese prose and verse from Nara to early Showa period, particularly in the genres of history, philosophy, and poetry.
Instructors: Keiko Ono

Korean-language courses (Spring 2021)

Elementary Korean II
A continuation of KOR 101. Continued development of proficiency in basic communication by balancing four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, Susie Kim, Hwichan Oh, Namseok Yong
Elementary Korean II
A continuation of KOR 101. Continued development of proficiency in basic communication by balancing four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi, Susie Kim, Namseok Yong
Intermediate Korean II
A continuation of KOR 105. Continued development of four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in Korean. Complex grammatical structures and irregularities are taught while the basics are reviewed. Idiomatic expressions are introduced. Journals are kept for writing practice.
Instructors: Susie Kim, Hwichan Oh, Namseok Yong
Intermediate Korean II
A continuation of KOR 105. Continued development of four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in Korean. Complex grammatical structures and irregularities are taught while the basics are reviewed. Idiomatic expressions are introduced. Journals are kept for writing practice.
Instructors: Susie Kim, Hwichan Oh, Namseok Yong
Intensive Korean II
A continuation of Korean 103. This course covers Intermediate Korean material, focusing on complex grammatical structures, reading, and writing. Journals are kept for writing practice. Students who have successfully completed KOR 103 and 108 are placed in KOR 301 for further practice of conversation. Those with strong conversational skills may also test into KOR 303, Integrative Korean, which focuses more on literacy.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Intensive Korean II
A continuation of Korean 103. This course covers Intermediate Korean material, focusing on complex grammatical structures, reading, and writing. Journals are kept for writing practice. Students who have successfully completed KOR 103 and 108 are placed in KOR 301 for further practice of conversation. Those with strong conversational skills may also test into KOR 303, Integrative Korean, which focuses more on literacy.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Advanced Korean II
A continuation of KOR 301. Continued development of proficiency in speaking and reading through short readings and class discussion. Vocabulary learning and discourse skills are emphasized.
Instructors: Seung Hee Cho
Advanced Korean II
A continuation of KOR 301. Continued development of proficiency in speaking and reading through short readings and class discussion. Vocabulary learning and discourse skills are emphasized.
Instructors: Seunghee Cho
Integrative Korean II
This course is a continuation of KOR303, focusing on stabilizing literacy development through a variety of authentic reading materials, class discussions, presentations and various writing assignments. Expanding advanced-level vocabulary based on Chinese characters is also emphasized.
Instructors: Namseok Yong
Integrative Korean II
This course is a continuation of KOR303, focusing on stabilizing literacy development through a variety of authentic reading materials, class discussions, presentations and various writing assignments. Expanding advanced-level vocabulary based on Chinese characters is also emphasized.
Instructors: Namseok Yong
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture II
Reading and discussion of thoughts and issues within contemporary Korean society. Readings are drawn from a variety of sociocultural and historical as well as sociolinguistic topics including family, marriage, gender issues, education, technology, and the changes of the language in both South and North Korea. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Contemporary Korean Language and Culture II
Reading and discussion of thoughts and issues within contemporary Korean society. Readings are drawn from a variety of sociocultural and historical as well as sociolinguistic topics including family, marriage, gender issues, education, technology, and the changes of the language in both South and North Korea. Class discussions are conducted in Korean.
Instructors: Yuseon Yun
Readings in Modern Korean II
This course is designed (1) to advance students' literacy skills to the Superior level; (2) to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, literature and history; and (3) to further develop their critical thinking through reading and writing in Korean. Focusing on change in the Korean language in relation to history, society, and culture, the course covers a wide range of sociocultural and political as well as sociolinguistic issues presented in classic short stories, poems, and historical texts.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi
Readings in Modern Korean II
This course is designed (1) to advance students' literacy skills to the Superior level; (2) to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, literature and history; and (3) to further develop their critical thinking through reading and writing in Korean. Focusing on change in the Korean language in relation to history, society, and culture, the course covers a wide range of sociocultural and political as well as sociolinguistic issues presented in classic short stories, poems, and historical texts.
Instructors: Ho Jung Choi