Lectures

Wed, Feb 10, 2021, 4:30 pm
Location: VIRTUAL LECTURE
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

Registration required. Register here.


Wed, Feb 17, 2021, 4:30 pm
Location: Virtual Lecture
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

Registration required. Register here.

This talk aims to better understand the complex role that written Chinese (hanwen/kanbun 漢文) played within the variation and history of Japanese written languages. The written language of classical Chinese became a means to write the Japanese language. The key factor in this development is kundoku 訓読, a system with which a written Chinese text can be read out as an idiom of Japanese.


Wed, Feb 24, 2021, 4:30 pm
Location: Virtual Lecture
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

Registration required. Register here.


Mon, Mar 1, 2021, 4:30 pm
Location: Virtual
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

Josh Goldstein will introduce his book Remains of the Everyday which traces the changing material culture and industrial ecology of China through the lens of recycling. Over the last century, waste recovery and secondhand goods markets have been integral to Beijing’s economic functioning and cultural identity, and acts of recycling have figured centrally in the ideological imagination of modernity and citizenship. On the one hand, the Chinese state has repeatedly promoted acts of voluntary recycling as exemplary of conscientious citizenship.


Wed, Mar 3, 2021, 4:30 pm
Location: Virtual
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

Kikuko Hirafuji is professor at Kokugakuin University, and Director of Institute for Japanese Culture and Classics at the University. She specializes history of study of Japanese mythology, and translation issuues about Kojiki and Nihonshoki.


Wed, Mar 31, 2021, 4:30 pm
Location: Virtual
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

Bruce Rusk (PhD History, UCLA, 2004) is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia. He studies the cultural history of early modern China (14th to 18th centuries), focusing on cultural practices of authentication and deception, on the history of philology, and cultural uses of writing and books.