Lectures

Wed, Feb 20, 2019, 4:30 pm
Location: 202 Jones
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

The Public Performance of Justice: The Transcultural Career of an Early Chinese Political Installation Across Eurasia


Tue, Feb 26, 2019, 4:30 pm
Location: 211 Dickinson Hall
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

This is a Davis Center Works in Progress series.

The Shelby Cullom Davis Center Works in Progress series provides an informal forum for department faculty to present current research to the local history community for feedback and discussion.

Due to limited capacity, please RSVP to jhoule@princeton.edu.


Wed, Mar 6, 2019, 4:30 pm
Location: 202 Jones
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

Talk and Discussion Topics:


Wed, Mar 27, 2019, 4:30 pm
Location: 106 McCormick
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

Painted portraits were of paramount importance in Chinese society of the Ming and Qing dynasties (1368-1912) and produced in enormous numbers, on a scale even larger than in the West. Yet, in Chinese art history and art collections they figure less prominently than in the West. Portraits documented families and ancestors in China, and with the exception of portraits of famous artists or scholars remained separate from the world of art. Consequently, they have been studied much less, and many questions remain about the practice of portrait painting.


Wed, Apr 3, 2019, 4:30 pm
Location: 202 Jones
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

 

Death in Edo: Hayashi Razan between Japan, China and Korea


Wed, Apr 24, 2019, 4:30 pm
Speaker(s):
Category: Department, Program

When the Ming dynasty (1368-1644 CE) government looked like the misbegotten union of a totalitarian emperor and a cowardly, grasping bureaucracy, shrines to the living – primarily to late-Ming eunuch dictator Wei Zhongxian – looked like absurd manifestations of wicked megalomania.  But now scholars take a more balanced view of the complicated strengths and weakness of a state that did last for 276 years.  Ming living shrines, too, deserve a second look.  For they appear frequently in the historical record -- across the whole span of the dynasty (indeed of the imperial period), the whole...