Fang Yan

Position
Lecturer in East Asian Studies
Role
Chinese Language
Office Phone
Office
232 Frist Campus Center
Degrees
  • Ph.D. Chinese Linguistics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  • M.A. Chinese Linguistics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  • M.A. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, Nankai University

  • B.A. Chinese Language and Literature, Henan University

Bio/Description

Fang Yan received her Ph.D. in Chinese Linguistics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.A. in Applied Linguistics and a B.A. in Chinese Language and Literature. Her research focuses on experimental phonetics and phonology, especially the study of the super-segmental features of Chinese, such as the interaction of intonation and tones, and the interaction of tones and stress. Currently she is working on a project about the study of language typology on word-stress. Yan also studies second language acquisition, primarily on Chinese as a second language, and Chinese pedagogy. She has received research grants from the Princeton Center for Language Studies and built a database for Chinese grammar instruction with videos.

Yan has been teaching all levels of Chinese language classes and Chinese linguistic courses for over 10 years. She has also led study abroad programs for 8 summers and conducted language teaching training workshops at different institutions.

Selected Publications
  • “Why are the three prosodic elements not synchronized? – The prosodic mapping analysis on declarative and interrogative sentences in Mandarin Chinese,” Experimental Linguistics, Vol. 9.1 (2020): 8-16.
  • “Experimental phonetic Study on the merging of the 2nd Tone and the 3rd Tone in the acquisition of Chinese as a second language,” Journal of Chinese Language Teachers Association, 2015, Vol.50.1: 19-41.
  • “A sociolinguistic study of the addressing terms for young women in Tianjin,” Nankai Linguistics, 2015, Vol.25.1: 132-140.
  • “Experimental research of the intonation of Chinese declarative sentences produced by Korean Chinese learners,” Experimental Linguistics, 2012. Vol.1.1: 47-53.